(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Announcements for the year"



&.\^ 3w^ b 



^T UNIVERSITY OF OREGON BULLETIN 



New Series 



NOVEMBER 1, 1916 



Vol. XIV, No. 1 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1916-1917 



W^ 






Prepared by 

EARL KILPATRICK 

Secretary of the League 

Assistant Dean of the Extension Division 

University of Oregon 



Published semi-monthly by the University of Oregron, and entered at the postoffice in Eugene, 
Orej^on, as second-class matter 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1916-1917 



Mf^^^^p^^ 



T«E LIGHAfiy (if 7;]£ 
NOV £-1929 

OmmSllY OF ILLINOIS 



Salem, Oregon : 

State Printing Department 

1916 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 




Crook County High School 
Team, Winners State Cham- 
pionship Debate in Guild Hall, 
May 12, 1916. 



H. C Baughman, Principal 
Crook County Higli School at 
Prineville 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



|^^^^^^^H|R^^, ^^^^1 


PB 




^^^^^ 


!|^H 




^^B^^V 




1^^^^^ * ^R^^5L-^i::^?!SliHHMil 


|^^^B|m.ik ^ 




^^^Hi|^*^ ml 




Mtk 


^ 


Jefferson High School Debal^^ 


f 


^' 


Squad 
Top Row — Left to right— Hazt-l 


iflKil 


Ik "' 


Freeman, Mary Chute, Gladys 
Overholzer 


J/Ktm. 


^ i 


Bottom Row — Lerant Pease. 


m 


4, 


Kenneth Armstrong, Herbert 
Booth and Milton Mason 

The team that debated in the 


dfc 


p. 

4 


final was composed of Kenneth 
Armstrong, Leader, and Milton 
Mason, Colleague. 

Bert Lombard, P^rincipal and 




wtw 


Coach 





OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Pictures of Competitors in vState Cluiinpioiisbii) Finals 2-H 

Officers for tlie Year 1916-17 5 

Executive Committee 5 

Question for Debate 5 

Debate League Calendar for 1916-17 5 

Districts and Directors 6 

Subjects of Debates Held by League 7 

State Champions 7 

Schools in Debate League 1915-16 S 

Members of League 1916-17 8 

Greeting from President Campbell 9 

Message of President Kirk 9 

Work of the League by Earl Kilpatrick 10 

Oregon State Library Notes 12 

How to Borrow Debate Libraries from State Library 15 

Bibliography on Compulsory Health Insurance 16 

Constitution and By-Laws of the League 28 

Score Cards for Use of Judges 29 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1916-17 

R. L. Kirk, Superintendent of Schools, Springfield, President 

Earl Kilpatrick, Assistant Dean of tlie Extension Division 

University of Oregon, Eugene, Secretary-Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

P. L. Campbell, President of the University of Oregon 

J. A. Churchill, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

R. L. Kirk, Superintendent of the Springfield Schools 

Cornelia Marvin, Librarian. Oregon State Library 

Earl Kilpatrick. Assistant Dean of the Extension Division 

University of Oregon 



QUESTION FOR DEBATE, 1916-17 

Resolved, that Oregon should adopt a health 
insurance law embodying the essential features 
of the "Standard Bill" of the American Associa- 
tion for Labor Legislation, 



DEBATE LEAGUE CALENDAR FOR 1916-17 

October 15 — Last date for entering the league. 

October 15 — Fee payable to secretary-treasurer. 

November 5— District Directors file schedule of preliminary debates witli 
Secretary. 

February 1— District Directors report district champions to secretary. 
April 15— Very latest date for settlement of last inter-district contest. 
May 11— Final debate for Championship of Oregon at the University of 
Oregon. 



OKE(iON HIGH SCHOOL DERATING LEAGUE 



THE DISTRICTS AND THEIR DIRECTORS 



Coos Bay — Siiperiiiteiident F. A. Tiedgeii, Marshfield, Director. Coos 
and Curry Counties. Champion in 191() : North Bend High School, 
defeated by Jefferson. 

Eastern Oregon — Superintendent C. A. Montandon, Enterprise, Director. 
Union and Wallowa Counties. Champion in 1916 : Enterprise High School, 
defeated by Crook C'ounty High School. 

Lower Columbia — Superintendent W. I. Wight of Clatskanie, Director. 
Clatsop, Columbia and Multnomah Counties. Champion in 1916: Astoria 
High School, defeated by Jefferson. 

Northern Willamette — Principal J. C. Nelson of Salem High School, 
Director. Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, Tillamook, Polk and Marion 
Counties. Champion in 1916 : Jefferson High School, defeated in final 
contest for State Championship by Crook County High School. 

Southern Oregon — Superintendent George A. Briscoe of Ashland, 
Director. Josephine and Jackson Counties. Champion in 1916: Klamath 
Falls, defeated by Jefferson. 

Southern Willamette— l*rincipal F. A. Scofield of Eugene High School, 
Director. Lincoln, Benton, Linn, Lane and Douglas Counties. Champion 
in 1916: Albany High School, defeated by North Bend. 

Umatilla — Superintendent A. T. Park of Pendleton High School, 
Director. Umatilla, Morrow, Gilliam and Wheeler Counties. Champion 
in 1916 : Condon High School, defeated by Enterprise. 

Upper Columbia — Principal H. C. Baughman of Crook County High 
School, Prineville, Director. Hood River, Wasco, Sherman. Crook and 
Jefferson Counties. Champion in 1916: Prineville, winner of State 
Championship. 

Southeastern Oregon — G. A. Kuring, Vale, Director. Baker, Malheur, 
Grant and Harney Counties. Champion in 1916 : Nyssa, defeated by 
Enterprise. 

South-Central Oregon — C. II. Bowman, Klamath Falls, Director. Klam- 
ath and Lake Counties. Organized in summer of 1916. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



SUBJECTS OF DEBATES HELD BY LEAGUE 



Year 


High 
Schools 
Enrolled 


State Qiiestion 


President 


Secretary 


1907-08 


28 


Proportional Repre- 
sentation 


E. T. Marlatte... 

A. L. Brigtis 

W. R. Rutherford 

W. R. Rutherford 
R. L. Kirk 

R. L. Kirk 


E. E. DeCou 


1908-09 
1909-10 


34 
35 


Sliip Subsidies 

Guarantee of Bank 
Deposits 




1910-11 

1911-12 

1912-13 
1913-14 
1914-15 

1915-16 

1916-17 


41 

28 

28 
33 
41 

51 

72 


National Conserva- 
tion of National 
Resources 

Cabinet System of 
State Government 

Large Navy 

Tariff 

Government Owner- 
ship of Railroads 

Swiss Military Sys- 
tem 

Health Insurance . 


E. E. DeCou 

J. L. Johnson 

R. W. Prescott 
R. W. Prescott 
- 

Earl Kilpatrick 











STATE CHAMPIONS 

The "Regents Cup" given by the members of the Board of Regents of 
the University of Oregon as individuals, to become the property of the 
school winning it twice, is in the permanent possession of Grants Pass, 
having been won by the following High Schools : 

1907-08— Lebanon. 

1908-09— Grants Pass. 

1909-10— Pendleton. 

1910-11— Grants Pass. 



The "University of Oregon Cup" given by the Laurean and Eutaxian 
Societies of the University and by Professor E. E. DeCou, founder of the 
league, is presented annually to the State Champions and will become the 
permanent property of the school winning it three times. This cup has 
been w^on by the following High Schools : 

1911-12— Albany. 

1912-13— North Bend. 

1913-14— Pendleton. 

1914-15— Salem. 

1915-16 — Crook County at Prineville. 



0RE(40N HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



LIST OF SCHOOLS IN DEBATE LEAGUE 1915-16 

Coos Bay — Myrtle l^oiiit, Marshfield. North Bend, Goquille, Bandon. 

Eastern Oregon — ITnion. Enterprise. Prairie Gity. 

Southeastern Oregon — Vale, Nyssa. Ontario. 

Lower Columbia — Tillamook. Astoria. (Matskanie. Bainier. Scappoose, 
Sr. Helens, St. Johns. 

North Willamette — Silverton, Woodburn, Jefferson. Ganby, Estacada. 
Forest Grove, Newberg, Oregon City, Salem. 

Southern Oregon — Ashland, Grants Pass, Klamath Falls, Medford, 
Talent. 

Southern Willamette — Albany, Brownsville, Corvallis. Eugene. Junction 
City, Lebanon, Koseburg, Springfield, Yoncalla. 

Umatilla — Athena, Condon, Echo. 

Upper Columbia — Bend, Madras. Moro. Prineville, The Dalles, Wasco, 
Redmond. 

MEMBERS OF THE DEBATE LEAGUE, 1916-17 

Lower Columbia District (W. 1. Wight, Clatskanie. Director) — Astoria, 
Corbett, Clatskanie, Seaside Union, Scappoose. 

Upper Columbia District (H. C. Baughman, Prineville, Director) — Cul- 
ver, Madras Union, Prineville, The Dalles, Wasco, Moro. 

Northern Willamette District (J. C. Nelson, Salem, Director) — Amity, 
Canby, Estacada, Forest Grove, Gaston, Hubbard, Hillsboro, Jefferson, 
Molalla, McMinnville, Milwaukie, Mill City, Oregon City, Stayton, Salem, 
Silverton, Sheridan, Tillamook, Woodburn, Turner. 

Southern Willamette District (F. A. Scofield, Eugene, Director) — 
Albany, Corvallis, Eugene, Glendale, Harrisburg, Junction City, Philomath, 
Springfield, Sutherlin, Scio, Lebanon. 

Southern Oregon District (George A. Briscoe, Ashland, Director) — 
Ashland, Central Point, Grants Pass, Medford, Talent, Phoenix. 

Coos Bay District (F. A. Tiedgen, Marshfield, Director) — Bandon, 
Coquille, Myrtle Point, Marshfield, North Bend. 

South-Central Oregon District (C. H. Bowman, Klamath Falls, Director) 
— Klamath Falls, Lakeview. 

Umatilla District (A. T. Park, Pendleton, Director) — Athena, Condon, 
Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, Pendleton, Stanfield (Reeves High School), 
Fossil (Wheeler County High School). 

Eastern Oregon District (C. A. Montandon, Enterprise, Director) — 
Enterprise, Elgin, La Grande, Union, Joseph, Wallowa, Lostine. 

Southeastern Oregon District (G. A. Ruring, Vale, Director)— Nyssa, 
Vale. Ontario. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

GREETING FROM PRESIDENT CAMPBELL 

University of Oregon, September 20, 1916. 
To the Members of the Oregon Debate League: 

The steadj^ growth of interest in the >York of the Debate League in 
Oregon is most encouraging. Already the University is feeling tlie strong 
stimulus in debate which is brought to it by the students who have had 
their training and practice in the high school debates. They enter the 
University keen in interest and eager for an opportunity to win honors 
in the inter-collegiate contests. Their preliminary training has placed 
them at a very great advantage. 

I sincerely hope that the number of students taking part in higli 
school debating this year may be greater than ever before, and that each 
school will get back of its debating team with the same enthusiastic 
support that it gives to its athletic teams. p. L. CAMPBELL. 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

October 12, 1916. 
To the Oregon High School Debating League: 

On behalf of the officials of the Del)ating League I wish to extend 
hearty congratulations to all individual students and all schools partici- 
pating in the activities of the League during the year 1915-16. 
By your interest, your hard work and your enthusiasm you have taken 
the League through its most successful year. 

A membership of fifty schools, spirited preliminaries, hard-fought 
semi-finals and intense interest on the part of all made the closing 
debate of the League the best and most impressive meeting that the 
writer has seen in eight years of work in the organization. 

The teams from Crook County and from Jefferson are entitled to 
special praise for their performances as they surpassed any previous 
attainments of High School debaters in Oregon. 

It is hoped that the present season will be as valuable as the past. 
The importance of the work of the League is receiving recognition in 
every quarter. At no far distant date the subject of debating will receive 
due credit as a High School study. Each school joining the League will 
hasten this day. 

A splendid topic for discussion has been chosen this year. The people 
of your community will be greatly interested in its social and economic 
aspects. It will afford a great many young people an unusual opportunity 
to cultivate the power of expression. 

May we not see you a member of the League? There are students in 
your school who are entitled to this chance. Join us now, and make this 
year the banner year of our history. 

Respectfully yours, 

R. L. KIRK, President of the League. 



10 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

THE WORK OF THE LEAGUE 

By EARL KILPATRICK, Secretary of the League 

The Swiss military question used last year proved ideal for high 
school debaters. There was not an over-abundance of material from whicli 
students could gather argument and authority. They were consequently 
thrown upon their own thinking and many debates showed an amount of 
original preparation that contrasted very favorably with the efforts of 
previous years. 

The final debate in Guild Hall at the University for the championship 
of the State was the best championship contest that has ever been heard 
in the High School League. Members of both teams gave analyses of the 
question which were clearly original and endeavored to adjust their cases 
during the progress of the debate to the arguments brought forward by 
their opponents. 

The question this year, chosen after long discussion and careful con- 
sideration by the Executive Committee, is one which will be much dis- 
cussed in the State of Oregon during the next ten years. Not every ques- 
tion can come so closely home to the experience of the student of high 
school age as did the question of last year. Health insurance for employed 
persons will probably come as near meeting this requirement as any other 
question that could have been selected. 

We hope that principals will keep in mind the self-evident proposition 
stated in this bulletin last year that it is in no sense the function of the 
debate league to provide debating experience and training in oral English 
to all the students of all the High Schools of the State. No system of 
contest debates can do that, although local leagues and later debates 
among defeated schools in the districts of the State League can accomplish 
much. The function of the League is to stimulate interest in debate, to 
offer the several high schools of the State opportunity to measure 
strength in competitive contests, and to determine each year the high 
school debate championship of Oregon. 

The number of schools in the League has increased 120 per 
cent in the past three years and there is no reason why a still further gain 
of at least 100 per cent should not be made next year. 

The Ninth and Tenth Districts of the League have been created by the 
Executive Committee since the opening of the 1916 season in order to 
make the determination of district championships less expensive. As 
more and more High Schools enter the League, the Executive Committee 
will doubtless create other districts and thus bring participation in the 
League within the reach of all High Schools in the State. This aim has 
very nearly been accomplished at present. 

Speaking of finances, I believe that every principal and superintendent 
will simplify matters by putting squarely up to his School Board as a 
business proposition the ])lan of putting the whole burden of financing 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 11 

debates upon the district as a legitimate expense to be audited l)y the 
School Board as readily as a bill for school furniture or for stove wood. 
Many of the schools have adopted this plan. 'There is no question that 
the School Board has authority to take this view of debate expense, and 
then all the round of socials and tag-days and personal contributions that 
sometimes seems necessary can be omitted, and, further, admission to the 
debates can be made absolutely free. 

The annual meeting of the League will take place in Portland during 
the meeting of the State Teachers' Association. Every school in the 
League is entitled to a representative and a vote. At this meeting the 
(piestion of further amending the constitution will doubtless be raised bj' 
interested members. Several changes were made at the annual meeting at 
Medford last December, all of them in the interest of making more 
definite the practices of the League so that there will Ite less chance in the 
future for misunderstanding. 

On the whole, the past year has been the most harmonious in the 
history of the League, yet certain misunderstandings have arisen which 
might have led to serious altercation had not the interested persons 
behaved with the utmost consideration and in a sportsmanlike manner. 
The most serious difficulties arose over the question of the visiting of 
debates of one school by representatives of another school in the League. 
This practice is one to be scrupulously avoided as it invariably leads to 
complications, is impliedly forbidden by the constitution, and usually 
would result in the disqualification of the offending school. 

At the annual meeting, Mr. A. R. Nichols of the Corvallis high school 
was appointed chairman of a committee to prepare a tentative course in 
debate or oral English to lie submitted with a view to recommendation for 
adoption by the high schools of Oregon. The other members of this com- 
mittee are Ethel I. Rigdon, head of the Department of English in the 
Salem high school, and Naomi Williamson, head of the work in oral 
English in the Eugene high school. This course, according to the motion 
authorizing the committee, is to be planned to cover one semester. The 
motion was made by State Superintendent J. A, Churchill, whose cordial 
support and keen interest in the work of the League are a source of much 
gratification to all interested in its welfare. 



12 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

OREGON STATE LIBRARY NOTES 

AIDS FOR DEBATERS 

A list of books recommended by the State Library for higli school 
libraries. The prices in parentheses are the "school prices" from the 
State School Library List. 

Parliamentary Practice: 

Gushing. New Cushing's manual of parliamentary law and prac- 
tice; rev. by C. K. Gaines. Johnson, Blagden & McTurnan. 75c. 
Paul. Parliamentary law. Century. 75c (68c). 
Robert. Primer of parliamentary law. Doubleday. 75c (57c). 
Robert. Rules of order. New ed. Scott. $1.00 (80c). 

Public Speaking: 

Clark & Blanchard. Practical public speaking. Scribner. $1.00 (90c). 
Everts. The speaking voice: principles of training simplified and 

condensed. Harper. $1.00 (78c). 
Shurter. Extempore speaking for school and college. Ginn. 90c (77c). 

Debating : 

Alden. Art of debate. Holt. $1.12 ($1.00). 

Carnegie library, Pittsburg. Debate index. 2d ed. Pittsburg, Carnegie 
library. 20c. 

An index to the debaters' manuals in the Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. 
Foster. Argumentation and debating. Houghton. $1.25. 

Contains specimen briefs and debates and a list of propositions for 
debate for advanced students. 
Foster. Debating for boys. Sturgis. $1.00. 

Foster. Essentials of exposition and argument. Houghton. 90c (78c). 
The best book upon the subject. Based upon his "Argumentation 
and debating." 
Gardiner. The making of arguments. Ginn. $1.00. 
Jones. Manual for debaters, with a list of questions and a bibliog- 
raphy. University of Washington. 15c. 
Laycock, Craven & Spofford. Manual of argumentation for high 
schools and academies. Macmillan. 50c (44c). 
Excellent book for beginners. 
Laycock & Scales. Argumentation and debate. Macmillan. $1.10. 

A good exposition of the principles of debating. More advanced than 
the book above. 
Lyon. Elements of debating. University of Chicago. $1.00 (95c). 
Phelps, comp. Debaters' manual. Wilson. $1.00. 

Compiled from various sources. Contains directions for the prepara- 
tion of a debate, and for the organization and management of 
debating societies, with bibliographies on many subjects suitable 
for debates. 
Thomas. Manual of debate. American Book Co. 80c (68c). 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Debating societies: 
organization and procedure. 2d ed. University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. How to judge a debate. 

University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Principles of effective 
debating. 3d ed. Wilson. 15c. 

The State Library has a few copies of these Wisconsin pamphlets for 
distribution. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 13 

Questions with Briefs: 

Brookings & Ringwalt. Briefs for debate on current political, economic 

and social topics. Longmans. $1.25. 
Note preface on "The art of debate." 
Carpenter. Debate outlines on public questions. New ed. Broadway 

Pub. Co. $1.00. 
Ringwalt. Briefs on public questions. Longmans. $1.20 (95c). 
Bobbins. High school debate book. McClurg. $1.00 (85c). 

Excellent for beginners. 
Shurter. Both sides of 100 public questions. Hinds, Noble & Eldredgr*. 

$1.25. 

Periodical Articles: 

Readers' guide to periodical literature, 1900-1904. Wilson. $16.00. 

1905-1909. Wilson. $24.00. 

1910-1914. Wilson. $32.00. 

These volumes are sold at special rates govei-ned by the size of the 
library. 
Annual volume, 1915. Wilson. $7.00 ($3.50). 

A file of some of the best periodicals is desirable, and a team which is 
constantly debating public questions must have access to the 
current numbers of the Outlook and Nation. Indexes to current 
magazines and newspapers are essential. All available indexes 
are owned by the State Library, and will be consulted for any 
subject upon request. It is possible that many of the magazine 
references may be borrowed from the people of the different 
towns. Articles indexed in the publications noted above may be 
rented from the Wilson Package Library, 208 University Bank 
Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. Seven articles will be loaned for two 
weeks for fifty cents ; additional articles in the same order, five 
cents each. A charge of one-half rate will be made for an exten- 
sion of two weeks or a fraction, for all articles except briefs and 
reports. No articles loaned for less than fifty cents. 

Government Documents (apply to Department or Congressman) : 

The library should have a file of the reports and bulletins of the Labor 
Department; sets of reports of the Department of Commerce; a set 
of publications of last census ; the Statistical Abstract ; the last 
Official Directory; Consular reports (with indexes) ; recent volumes 
of Congressional Record ; Presidents' messages ; Industrial Commis- 
sion report (difficult to secure) ; other sets should be secured for 
special needs — Reports of Commissioner of Immigration for debate 
on that subjec^, etc. 

Indexes to Government Documents: 

Write to Superintendent of Documents, AVashington. D. C. for the 
following : 

Catalog of public documents of the 53d-61st Congresses and all depart- 
ments of the government, March 4, 1893- June 30, 1911, vols. 1-10. 

Tables of and annotated indexes to the Congressional series of United 
States public documents. 1902. 

Index to the subjects of the documents and re])orts and to the com- 
mittees, senators and representatives presenting them, with tables 
of the same in numerical order, being the "Consolidated index'* 
provided for by the Act of January 12, 1895. 54th Congress, 1st 
session-date. December, 1895-date. 

Check list of United States public documents. 1789-1909. 3d ed. 
Vol. 2, not yet published, will be an index to Vol. 1. 

Monthly catalog. United States public documents. $1.10 a year. 



1-1 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATIN(J LEAGUE 



State Documents: 

Every liiiih school should have acc-ess to recent Oi-e;:;()ii state do(-uiiieiits, 
and particularly the Ore.i^on Blue Book, the annual report of the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, and annual report of State Industrial 
Accident Commission. Many of the public libraries receive one copy 
of each Orei?on document, and their files should be consulted before 
application is made for copies for a school. The Orej^on Blue Book 
is distributed by tlie Secretary of State. For lists of recent publica- 
tions of the various states the Monthly list of state publications, 
wliich may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, 
AVashin.ij^ton, I). C., for HOc a year, is most useful. 

Almanacs and Year Books (the last aniinal issue for each is given) : 

American year book, 1915. Appleton. $3.00 ($2.70). 

Especiahy useful in the fields of economics, political science, public 
works, legislation, commerce, politics, and government. 
Britannica year book, 1918. Encyclopedia Britannica Co. $2.25 
($2.08). 

Historical and statistical, covering the years 1910-12. 
Chicago Daily News almanac and year book, 1916. Chicago Daily News. 

25c. 
New international year book, 1915. Dodd. $5.00 ($4.00). 

Contains very full articles on all events of importance during the 
year and on all subjects that have been marked by change or 
progress. 
Statesman's yeur book, 1916. Macniillan. $3.00 ($2.70). 
World almanac and encyclopedia, 1916. New York, Press Pub. Co. 25e. 

General : 

Bliss. Encyclopedia of social reform. Funk. $7.50. 
Cyclopedia of American government; ed, by A. C. McLaughlin and A. 
B. Hart. 3 v. Appleton. $22.50 ($20.25). 

Encyclopedias : 

References are not given to these, but it is assumed that debaters will 
look up all questions in the New International and Britannica 
encyclopedias. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 15 

HOW TO BORROW DEBATE LIBRARIES FROM THE 
STATE LIBRARY, SALEM 

These collections of material a])on inihlic questions are loaned without 
charge to Oregon schools upon proper application. This means that the 
application must be made by the principal, or by the teacher who is in 
charge of the debate work. Loans are made through public libraries when 
possible, as it is generally considered better to supplement public library 
collections so that schools shall not pay cost of transportation upon 
material which is to be had locally, and shall not deprive other schools of 
this. The rules for debate library loans may be had upon application. 
The period of the loan is three weeks with possible renewal for two 
weeks if the material is not needed elsewhere. It is better for schools to 
apply for small libraries to be kept a short time, rather than to ask for 
complete libraries which cannot i)rofitably be used in so short a time. N.^ 
loans are made to schools which mark the books and pamphlets and return 
them in bad condition. The fine for keeping lil)i-aries beyond time is 25c 
a day. Privileges of the library are withdrawn in case of loss of pieces. 

The State Library makes every effort to meet the needs of the schools, 
but it has many borrowers among schools and debating societies and can 
do justice to all of them only by enforcing the rules strictly. 



16 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



COMPULSORY HEALTH INSURANCE 

READING LIST AND SUGGESTIONS BY THE OREGON 
STATE LIBRARY 

The question of coinitulsory licaltli iusurnnce is an important one, and 
doubtless will be considered in tlie le.uislatnres of many states during the 
coming year. In this country the American Association for Labor Legis- 
lation, through its Social Insurance Committee, has been the leader in 
creating a favorable sentiment toward such legislation. Its "Standards 
and tentative draft of an act" which is included in the bibliography, has 
been introduced, with some changes, in ^hissachusetts. New Jersey and 
New York. Investigating commissions have b,een created in Massachusetts 
and California, and they are to i-eport to the legislatures of these states m 
January, 1917. 

The "Brief for health insurance"" published by this association in June, 
1916, as volume six. number two, of the American Labor Legislation 
Review is the best publication favoring health insurance, and should be 
owned by each team. The bibliography contained in this "Brief" has been 
carefully checked, and the publications secured for circulation wherever 
possible. Many of the items from the following bibliography are taken 
from it. 

In its Workmen's compensation act, Oregon has in operation one branch 
of social insurance, and the law and the report of the Industrial Accident 
Commission which shows something of the operation of the law, are 
included in the bibliography. Many of the states have such laws, and 
Wisconsin has also a system of state life insurance. 

The bibliography contains the more important books and periodical 
articles on state insurance and compulsory health insurance. Libraries 
should have as many as possible of the items listed. Many of the pam- 
phlets may be secured at little or no cost from the societies publishing them. 
Books should be bought through one dealer, not from the individual pub- 
lishers. The periodicals are all of recent issue, and if not in the local 
library probably may be found in homes in the community. Current issues 
of tlie Survey should be examined as items concerning legislation will be 
noted there. 

Material listed in the bibliograi)hy will be loaned by the State Library 
under the usual conditions. New publications will be added as rapidly as 
Issued. Schools having any of this material should so state in their 
application, to avoid duplication and to insure the best service to all. If 
articles on any special point are desired special mention of that fact should 
be made, otherwise a selection will be sent covering all sides so far as 
possible. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 17 

Articles marked with a dagger (t) liave been copied by the State 
Library; those marked witli an asterisk (*) are recommended as of special 
value. When no price is given the publication usually may be obtained 
without charge from the publisher. 

STATE INSURANCE 

Books and Pamphlets: 

Gephart. Insurance and the state. 1913. Macmillan. $1.25. 
Hotchkiss. The case against state insurance. Reprinted from the 

Outlook, March 1, 1913. Workmen's compensation publicity bureau, 

80 Maiden Lane, New York, 
Lewis. State insurance : a social and industrial need. 1909. Houghton. 

$1.25. 
Oregon. Industrial accident commission. Annual report. 1st. 1913/14. 

Commission. 
Oregon. Industrial accident commission. The Workmen's compensation 

act: an opinion by Stapleton & Sleight. 1913. Commission. 
Oregon, Statutes. Workmen's compensation law, ch. 112, session laws 

of 1913, as amended 1915. 1915, Commission. 
Workmen's compensation pul)licity bureau. A resume of the arguments 

against state insurance. Rev. ed. 1914. Author, SO Maiden Lane, 

New York, 

COMPULSORY HEALTH INSURANCE 

Books and Pamphlets: 

Alden. Democratic England, pp. 122-43. 1912. Macmillan. $1.50. 

American association for labor legislation. The gist of the health 
insurance bill [and] Five good reasons for health insurance legisla- 
tion. Author, 131 East 23d Street, New York. 

*American association for labor legislation. Committee on social insur- 
ance. Health insurance: standards and tentative draft of an act. 
3d ed. 1916. Author, 131 East 23d Street, New York. 

For other publications of the American association for labor legislation, 
see articles in the American labor legislation review noted in the 
section devoted to Periodical articles. 

American medical association. Judicial council. Excerpts from the 
report of the Judicial council submitted to the house of delegates at 
San Francisco, June 21, 1915. (American medical association. Bul- 
letin. May 15, 1915. v, 10, pp. 341-96) Author, 103 Dearborn 
Avenue, Chicago, 

Andrews. Health insurance and the prevention of tuberculosis. 
Reprinted from the Medical record, Feb. 26, 1916. William Wood & 
Company, 51 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Andrews. Physical examination of employees. Reprinted from Ameri- 
can journal of public health, v. 5, no. 12. American journal of 
public health, 755 Boylston Street, Boston. 

Bernhard. Future of social policy in Germany ; tr. by L. H. Gray. 
1912. Fidelity and casualty company, 92-94 Liberty Street, New 
York. 50c. 

Bernhard. Undesirable results of German social legislation ; tr. by 
H, G. Villard. 1914. Workmen's compensation publicity bureau, 
80 Maiden Lane. New York. 



18 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

Bullock, comp. Selected articles on coiiipuLsory insurance. 1912. H. 
W. Wilson Company. $1.00. 

California. Social insurance commission. Social insurance in Califor- 
nia. 1916. Commission, Sacramento, Cal. 

Carr, Garnett & Taylor. National insurance. 1913. Macmillan. $3.75. 

Chamberlain. Health insurance, (in National conference of charities 
and corrections. Proceedings, 1915. v. 42, pp. 557-70) 

Commons & Andrews. Principles of labor legislation, pp. 385-97. 1916. 
Harper. $2.00. 

*Curtis. Social insurance. National casualty company, Majestic 
Building, Detroit, Mich. 

Opposed to state health insurance. 

Dawson. Social insurance in Germany, 1883-1911 ; its history, opera- 
tion, results, and a comparison with the National insurance act, 1911. 
1912. Unwin. $2.00. 

Fabian Society. The insurance bill and the workers : criticisms and 
amendments of the National insurance bill. 1911. Fabian Society. 

Fabian Society. National insurance bill. 1911. Fabian Society. 

Fisher. The coming movement for extending human life. Reprinted 
from American journal of public health, v. 5, no. 1. Life extension 
institute, 25 West 45th Street, New York. 

Fisher. The costs of tuberculosis in the United States and their reduc- 
tion. Committee of one hundred on national health, 69 Church 
Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Fisher. Economic aspects of lengthening human life. Committee of 
one hundred on national health, 69 Church Street, New Haven, Conn. 

Fisk. Life saving as a function of life insurance. Life extension insti- 
tute, 25 West 45th Street, New York. 

Fisk. Periodic examination of supposedly well persons. Reprinted 
from the Kentucky medical journal, Feb. 1, 1915. Life extension 
institute, 25 West 45tli Street, New York. 

Forrest. For the attention of workingmen and women. North Amer- 
ican accident insurance company. Rookery Building, Chicago. 
Opposed to state health insurance. 

Frankel & Dawson. Workingmen's insurance in Europe. 1910. Chari- 
ties publication committee. $2.50. 

Friedensburg. Practical results of workingmen's insurance in Germany ; 
tr. by L. H. Gray. 1911. Workmen's compensation service and infor- 
mation bureau, 1 Liberty Street, New York. 

Gephart. Principles of insurance, pp. 290-304. 1911. Macmillan. 
$1.60. 

Gibbon. Medical benefit: a study of the experience of Germany and 
Denmark. 1912. P. S. King & Son. $1.70. 

Great Britain. Statutes. National insurance act. 1911. Wyman. 
Also found in Bulletin no. 102 of the U. S. Bureau of Labor. 

Henderson. Industrial insurance in the United States. 1909. Uni- 
versity of Chicago press. $2.00. 

Howe. Socialized Germany, pp. 192-207, 258-64. 1915. Scribner. 
$1.50. 

Jenkins. Illness insurance, (in National conference of charities and 

corrections. Proceedings, 1915. v. 42, pp. 570-75) 
Kennedy. Beneficiary features of American trade unions, pp. 72-83. 
1908. Johns Hopkins press. 50c. 

Klebs. Insurance of industrial workingmen as an instrument of tuber- 
culosis prevention, (in National association for the study and pre- 
vention of tuberculosis. Transactions, 1906. pp. 141-56) 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 19 



National association of manufacturers. Committee on industrial bet- 
terment. Report, presented at twenty-first annual meeting, New- 
York, May, 1916. 1916. National association of manufacturers, 
Chemical Building, St. Louis. 

^National civic federation. Social insurance department. Report of tlie 
Committee on preliminary foreign inquiry. 1914. Author, Metro- 
politan Tower, New York. $1.00. 

National convention of insurance commissioners. Report of Committee 
on industrial health and accident settlements. 1911. Reprinted 
from Proceedings, 1911. v. 2. F. H. McMaster, Secretary, Columbia, 
S. C. 

Ogg. Social progress in contemporary Euro])e. ])p. 246-92. 1912. 
Macmillan. $1.50. 

^Progressive party. National service. Sickness insurance, prepared 
for the Committee on social and industrial justice of the Progressive 
national service. Progressive national service. 42d Street Building, 
New York. 

Rittenhouse, America's pressing mortality problem. 191o. Life exten- 
sion institute, 25 West 45th Street, New York. 

Rubinow. Social insurance with special reference to American condi- 
tions. 1913. Holt. $3.00. 

*Rubinow. Standards of health insurance. 1916. Holt. $1.50. 

Reprinted, with some changes, from Journal of political economy, 
March, April, May, 1915. 

Seager. Social insurance, pp. 24-83. 1910. Macmillan. $1.00. 

State charities aid association. Sickness in Dutchess County, its extent, 
care, and prevention. Association, 105 East 22d Street, New York. 

Thornton. The place of medical care in a workingman's budget, (in 
Boston dispensary. Report of the 119th year. pp. 43-47) 

University debaters' annual. 1915-16. pp. 240-91. 1916. H. W. Wilson 
company. $1.80. 

U. S. Government Documents: 

These may be secured by application to the department issuing them. 
Fisher. National vitality, its waste and conservation : extract from 

the report of the National conservation commission. 1909. Supt. 

of documents. 
U. S. Bureau of the census. United States life tables, 1910. 1916. 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. 

1912. (its Bulletin 101) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Workmen's insurance and benefit funds in the 

United States. 1909. (its 23d Annual report, 1908) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Workmen's insurance and compensation systems 

in Europe. 2 v. 1911. (its 24th Annual report, 1909) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Workmen's insurance code of July 19, 1911, of 

Germany; tr. by Henry J. Harris. 1911. (its Bulletin 96, pp. 

501-774) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. British national insurance act, 1911. 1912. (its 

Bulletin 102) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Sickness and accident insurance law of Swit- 
zerland. 1912. (its Bulletin 103) 
U. S. Bureau of labor. Law rebiting to insurance of salaried employees 

in Germany. 1913. (its Bulletin 107) 
U. S. Bureau of labor statistics. Social insurance in Denmark [and] 

Social insurance in Germany, (its Monthly review 2:70-78. May, 

1916) 



20 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

U. S. Bureau of l{il)or statistics. Sickness insurance in France, (its 

Monthly review 3 :l)0-96, Sept., 1916) 
U. S. Bureau of labor statistics. Social insurance in Switzerland, (its 

Monthly review 3:96-98, Sept., 1916) 
tU. S. Commission on industrial relations. Final report, pp. 202-7. 

1915. Commission, Washington, D. C. 
U. S. Public health service. Community sickness survey. L. H. Fran- 

kel and L. I. Dublin, (its Public health reports 31:423-38, Feb. 25, 

1916) 

Also issued in reprint. 

U. S. Public health service. Statistics of disability : compilation of 

some of the data available in the United States. B. S. Warren and 

Edgar Sydenstricker. (its Public health reports 31:989-99, April 

21, 1916) 
*Warren. Sickness insurance: its relation to public health and the 

common welfare. 1915. (U. S. Public health service. Reprint no. 

250 from U. S. Public health reports) 
*Warren & Sydenstricker. Health insurance, its relation to the public 

health. 1916. (U. S. Public health service. Public health bulletin 

no. 76) 

May be obtained from Supt. of documents, Washington, D. C, for 10c. 

Periodical Articles: 

In citing periodical articles the practice of the periodical indexes 
has been followed, and the reference is given in the following 
order: First, title of article; second, name of author; third, name 
of magazine, followed by volume, pages and date of publication. 

Voluntary social insurance vs. compulsory : should the toilers surrender 
their freedom for a few crumbs? Samuel Gompers. American 
federationist 23 :333-57, 453-66, 669-81, May, June, August, 1916. 
Sickness insurance. I. M. Rubinow. American labor legislation review 

3:162-71, June, 1913. 
Sickness insurance. American labor legislation review 4 :49-72, March, 
1914. 

Contains the following articles, with discussion : 

Practicability of compulsory sickness insurance in America, by J. P. 
Chamberlain. Sickness benefit funds among industrial workers, 
by W. L. Chandler. Trade union sickness insurance, by J. M. 
Lynch. 

The social cost of sickness. Haven Emerson. American labor legisla- 
tion review 6 :11-15, March, 1916. 

Organization of medical service. M. M. Davis, jr. American labor 
legislation review 6 :16-20, March, 1916. 

Plan for a health insurance act [with discussion]. H. R. Seager. 
American labor legislation review 6:21-37, March, 1916. 

*Brief for health insurance. American labor legislation review 6:123- 

275, June, 1916. 

Contents: Is health insurance "paternalism"? by William Hard. 

Compulsory health insurance in Great Britain, by O. S. Halspy. 

Tendencies in health insurance legislation, by M. A. Hobbs. 

Voluntary health insurance in New York City, by Anna Kalet. 

Brief for health insurance. Health insurance standards. Tentative 

draft of an act. Select critical bibliography on health insurance. 
This pamphlet may be obtained from the American Association for 

Labor Legislation, 131 East 2 3d Street, New York, for one dollar. 

Better doctoring for less money. R. C. Cal)ot. American magazine 

81 :7-9, 77-78, April, 1916. 
Social insurance. H. W. Bullock. Case and comment 22:289-95, 413-16, 

Sept.-Oct., 1915. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 21 

British national insurance act. Cliautauquan 65 :305-7, Feb., 1912. 

The [British] insurance act at work. Rose Gardner. Contemporary 
review 106:41-51, July, 1914. 

fThe biggest present human-welfare job [sickness insurance]. Every- 
body's 34 :531-32, April, 1916. 

National insurance bill. Independent 70:983-84, May 11, 1911. 

The Lloyd-George insurance scheme. Independent 70 :1281-82, June 8, 
1911. 

The British insurance act. Sydney Brooks. Independent 73:132-36, 
July 18, 1912. 

Standards of sickness insurance. I. M. Rubinow. Journal of political 
economy 23:221-51, 327-64, 437-64, March-May, 1915. 

Reissued in book form, with some changes, as Standards of health 
insurance. 

Social insurance and the medical profession. I. M. Rubinow. Journal 

of the American medical association 64 :381-86, Jan. 30, 1915. 
Dispensary abuse and certain problems of medical practice. J. W. 

Williams. Journal of the American medical association 66:1902-8, 

June 17, 1916. 
Report of Committee on social insurance, American medical association. 

Journal of the American medical association 66 : 1951-85. June 17, 

1916. 
Britain's medical insurance law. Literary digest 46 :271-72, Feb. 8. 

1913. 
Medical organization of sickness insurance. M. M. Davis, jr. Medical 

record 89 :54-58, Jan. 8, 1916. 
Plan for the care of the insured under the proposed health insurance 

law. A. C. Burnham. Medical record 89 :737-39, April 22, 1916. 
t Compulsory health insurance. R. M. Easley. New England magazine 

55:39-41, June, 1916. 
Health insurance. New republic 6 :200-l, March 25, 1916. 
A government plea for health insurance. New republic 7 :55-57, May 20, 

1916. 
National insurance against invalidity and old age. E. J. Schuster. 

19th century 69:351-68, Feb., 1911. 
Insuring a nation. P. J. Lennox. North American 195 :108-19, Jan., 

1912. 
The Lloyd George insurance bill. Outlook 99 :1036-37, Dec. 30, 1911. 
The British national insurance act. Edward Porritt. Political science 

quarterly 27:260-80, June, 1912. 
The British national insurance act. R. F. Foerster. Quarterly journal 

of economics 26 :275-312, Feb., 1912. 
Bernhard's Unerwiinschte folgen der deutschen sozialpolitik, and its 

critics. L. S. Gannett. Quarterly journal of economics 28:561-78, 

May, 1914. 
Social insurance, old age pensions, and poor relief. R. M. Woodbury. 

Quarterly journal of economics 30 :152-71, Nov., 1915. 
State insurance in Germany. Review of reviews 49 :610-11, May, 1914. 
New York's health insurance project. Review of reviews 53 :365-66, 

March, 1916. 
fThe protection of the strong : a discussion of the working of the insur- 
ance laws for the protection of the poor. Scientific American sup- 
plement 79 :343, May 29, 1915. 
British insurance bill. Survey 26:583-86, July 15, 1911. 
British national insurance bill. H. R. Seager. Survey 26 :882-84, Sept. 

23, 1911. 



22 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



The strii,i,^j2:le for the British health bill. R. J. Brodsky. Survey 27: 

1300-12, Dec. 2, 1911. 
British uiiemploymeiit and health insurance law. Survey 27:1622-23, 

Jan. 20, 1912. 
Is the German industrial insurance system a failure? a reply to Dr. 

Friedensburj;. R. T. Brodsky. Survey 28 :233-38, May 4, 1912. 
Social insurance and the "doctor's future" — British social insurance and 

the doctor's union. Survey 29:318-19, Dec. 14, 1912. 
[The British national insurance act.] Survey 29:373-74, Dec. 21, 1912. 
The specter of malin,i::erinij:. I. M. Ruhinow. Survev 31 :97-8, Oct. 25, 

1913. 
(Jerman invalidity insurance and the fi.^ht ajjjainst tuberculosis. Survey 

31:016-17, Feb. 14, 1914. 
Sick clubs : co-operative medical service. R. A. Allen. Survey 32 :526- 

27, Auii;. 22, 1914. 
Sickness insurance and its possibilities in mining and railroading. J. P. 

Chamberlain. Survey 33:423-26, Jan. 16, 1915. 
An American report on British social insurance [l)y] J. W. Sullivan, 

Arthur Williams, and P. T. Sherman for the National civic federa- 
tion, reviewed by O. S. Halsey. Survey 33:695-96, March 27, 1915. 
tHealth and unemployment insurance [the Massachusetts bill]. Survey 

35 :624, Feb. 26, 1916. 
fHealth insurance uow a practical issue. Survey 35:691-92, March 11, 

1916. 
tHealth insurance before Congress. Survey 36 :115, April 29, 1916. 
fHealth insurance "made in Europe." R. M, Bradley. Survey 36:204-5, 

May 20, 1916. 
tUnion benefits and state funds. Survey 36 :205, May 20, 1916. 
tHealth insurance: the spread of the movement. I. M. Rubinow. 

Survey 36 :407-9, July 15, 1916. 
Lloyd-George's great experiment. World's work 22 :14556-57, July, 1911. 
Llovd-George's England. Clarence Poe. World's work 25:100-11, Nov., 

1912. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 23 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ARTICLE I 

NAME 

This organization shall l)e known as the Oregon High School Debating 
League. 

ARTICLE II 

OBJECT 

The object of this League is improvement in debate among the students 
in the high schools of the State of Oregon. 

ARTICLE III 
MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any public high school in Oregon may become a member of 
this League upon application to the Executive Committee of the League 
and shall retain such membership sc long as it conforms to the constitution 
and by-laws. 

Section 2. All schools seeking admission for any particular year must 
join by October 15 of that year. 

Section 3. The annual dues of one dollar shall be paid to the Treasurer 
by October 15. Failure to pay dues shall cancel membership. 

ARTICLE IV 
OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, DUTIES 

Section 1. The officers of the League shall be a President and n 
Secretary-Treasurer. They shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee of the League shall consist of the 
President and the Secretary, who shall act with the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, the President of the University of Oregon, and the 
Secretary of the Oregon Library Commission. This committee shall have 
power to increase its membership by two additional memliers, one of 
whom shall be a county superintendent. 

Section 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President to preside at the 
annual meeting, and at the final contest, and, when necessary, to call 
meetings of the Executive Committee. 

(b) It shall be the duty of the Secretary-Treasurer to keep minutes 
of the annual meeting, and of the meetings of the Executive Committee; 
to disburse funds upon order of the Executive Committee; to collect 
annual dues and perform other duties pertaining to the office. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee: 

To pair the district champion teams, to choose sides and to make 
other arrangements for the inter-district contests, on the basis of 



24 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

convenience and least expense. The pairinsj? and choice of sides for the 
inter-district and final debates shall begin before the conclusion of the 
district debates, and the Secretary shall submit the schedule to the 
Executive Committee before it becomes final. 

To cooperate with the two directors, whose districts shall be repre- 
sented in the final contest, in makinj,' arran.^ements for that contest. 

To select the question for debate. 

To prepare and have printed each year, before December 1, a year 
book containing- the latest revision of the constitution and by-laws, the 
list of names and addresses of the officers, statement of question for 
district, inter-district and final contests, with bibliography, and such 
otlier matter as, in their judgment, may be helpful to the members of the 
League. 

Section 4, The Executive Committee shall appoint for each district one 
director who shall be the principal (or other representative) of the 
League high schools in his district. 

It shall be the duty of the director : 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other representa- 
tives) of the League high schools in his district. 

To cooperate with the principals (or other representatives) of the 
League high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, and in making 
other arrangements for the several series of district contests on the basis 
of convenience and expense. In case of disagreement the district director 
shall have final authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the Secretary of the League, for permanent record, and 
for the reference of the Executive Committee, not later than November 5, 
an approved schedule of the debates for his district. He shall report to 
the Secretary the results of all contests immediately after they shall have 
been held, giving the names of the contesting schools and their representa- 
tives, together with the votes of the judges. No debate shall be considered 
as having been held under the auspices of the League unless the schedule 
shall have been filed with the Secretary as above directed, and the results 
immediately reported. 

To furnish the Executive Committee all other necessary information 
with regard to the workings of the League in his district. 

ARTICLE V 
MEETINGS, ELECTIONS 

Section 1. The directors in the several districts shall, at any time 
they deem it necessary, call meetings of the principals (ov other repre- 
sentatives) of the league high schools in their respective districts. 

Section 2. The annual meeting shall be held at the time of the State 
Teachers' Association. At this meeting the officers shall be elected, each 
for a period of one year. Each league high school shall be entitled to 
only one vote. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 25 

ARTICLE VI 
DEBATING DISTRICTS 

The State shall be divided into debatin.s,' districts by the Executive 
Board of the League. 

ARTICLE VII 

CONTESTS 

Section 1. District Contests. The district contests, held by teams 
representing the several higli schools within each district, shall occur 
between the first of November and the first of February. The team 
winning in the last series of these contests shall be the district champion 
team. The triangular system of debate is urged wherever conditions 
permit, leaving the method of grouping by twos in other cases. 

Section 2. Inter-District Contests. The inter-district contests, held by 
the several district champion teams, shall occur between the first of March 
and the first of May. The two teams winning in these contests shall be 
the two inter-district champion teams. 

Section 3. Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two inter- 
district champion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon at a 
time to be fixed by the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Section 1. The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the schools 
which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date in at least 
three subjects that they are taking at the time of the contest. 

No person over twenty-one years of age at the date of his enrollment 
for the school year shall be eligible to represent a high school in a 
contest held under the auspices of the League. 

Section 2. The team that shall represent any league high school shall 
be selected by a series of try-outs. In cases where this seems impracti- 
cable a different method may be used when authorized by the Executive 
Committee. Without such permission the team selected in any other 
manner shall not be considered eligible to the district debates. 

Section 3. At all contests the debaters shall be separated from the 
audience and shall receive no coaching while the debate is in progress. 

Section 4, At all contests, in which each team shall be represented 
by three members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as 
follows : 

First speaker, affirmative, 12 minutes (introduction and direct 
argument). 

First speaker, negative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refutation). 

Second spealcer, affirmative, 12 minutes (direct argument and refuta- 
tion). 



26 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ScH'Oiul speaktM-, iiejjjative, 12 miiuites (diroc-t ar,u;ninoiit and refutation). 

Third sin^alver, affirmative, 12 minutes (dii-ect argument and refuta- 
tion). 

Third speaker, nepitive, 12 minutes (direct ar^jjument and refutation), 

Closer, nei?ative, G minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, minutes (rebuttal and summai-y). 

Section H. At all contests, in which eacli team shall be represented by 
two members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as follows: 

First speaker, affirmative. 15 minutes (introduction and direct 
argument). 

First speaker, negative. 15 minutes (direct argument and refutation). 

Second speaker, affirmative, 15 minutes (dii-ect ar.uniment and refu- 
tation). 

Second speaker, negative. 15 minutes (direct argument and refutation). 

Closer, negative, G minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, G minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

No new argument allowed in either of the last two speeches. 

Section G. There shall be no cheering while any debater is speaking 
and the chairman or presiding officer shall make this announcement 
before the debate and shall use all means to enforce the rule. In cases 
of cheering, time so consumed may be made up to the speaker at the 
discretion of the chairman or presiding officer. 

ARTICLE IX 

Section 1. At each contest there shall be three judges selected on the 
l>asis of capability and impartiality; and so far as possible, they shall be 
non-local. The principals of any two contesting schools may by mutual 
agreement, however, decide upon one judge to determine the issue, pro- 
vided that three judges must be selected in all cases where the principals 
cannot agree upon one judge. 

Section 2. The judges for inter-district debates shall be appointed by 
the Executive Committee, but in no case shall a member of said com- 
mittee take part in the selection of judges in a case where he is personally 
interested. For the district contests, the principals of the two schools 
represented shall select the judges as follows : The principal of the visiting 
school shall submit a list of nine judges to the home school, from which to 
select three. If less than this number are satisfactory, the principal of the 
home school shall present a like list for selection, and so on until three 
mutually satisfactory judges are selected. The consideration of judges 
shall be taken up a month or more before the contest, and if possible, the 
final selection shall be made not less than a week before the debate. 

Section 3. As soon as the judges shall be selected, they shall be supplied 
each wath a copy of "How to Judge a Debate." Copies can l)e secured 
from the district directors or from the Secretary of the League. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 27 

Section 4. During the debate the judges shall sit apart from one 
another. They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal, and 
effectiveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the debate 
and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the conclusion of 
the contest, without consultation with any other judge, shall write on 
a card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal it in an envelope, and 
deliver it to the presiding officer, who shall open the envelopes in sight 
of the two leaders, and then announce to the audience the decision. 

ARTICLE X 

EXPENSES 

Section 1. In all triangular and dual contests, both district and inter- 
district, in which each school is represented by an affirmative and u 
negative team, the expenses of the judges, and the hotel bills and railway 
mileage of the visiting teams (the three — or two, as the case may be — 
debaters and one member of the high school faculty) shall l)e pooled and 
borne equally by the competing schools. Immediately after each contest, 
each school shall submit an itemized account of its expenses to the director 
of the district, or some one appointed by him. The director shall add the 
total expenses, divide them proportionately, and make such collections and 
reimbursements as may be necessary to effect an equitable adjustment of 
expense burdens. In all contests which involve a single deljate, the prin- 
cipals of competing schools shall mutually agree upon an equitable division 
of expenses. The consideration of this question shall be taken up a month 
or more before the contest. If a satisfactory agreement shall not have 
been reached at least two weeks before the contest, the question shall be 
referred to the district director for final adjudication and settlement. In 
case the school of any district may be able to agree upon some other more 
satisfactory system, they shall not be bound by this section in their 
intra-district contests. 

Section 2. Whenever two competing teams may find it more convenient 
or less expensive to meet at some halfway point, the two schools repre- 
sented by these teams shall share equally the expense, or make some 
special arrangements for defraying the expenses of that particular debate. 

Section 3. At the final contest the University shall pay the expenses of 
the judges and the hotel bills and traveling expenses of the two teams. 

ARTICLE XI 

AMENDMENTS 

This constitution and by-laws may be amended at any annual meeting 
by a majority of the league high schools present. But no school shall have 
more than one vote. Amendments may also be made at any time by 
majority vote of the Executive Committee, subject to ratification at the 
next annual meeting. 



28 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

BY-LAWS 

1. It shall be considered Improper to entertain judges before the contest 
at any place other than the hotel. 

2. It shall be considered dishonorable for one school to visit the debates 
of another school when these two schools are likely to meet on the same 
question. 

3. It shall be considered dishonorable for any' debater, in any manner, 
to plagiarize his speech. 

4. The question used in intra-district and in inter-district debates shall 
be the same as the State question. 

5. The "University of Oregon Cup" shall become the permanent prop- 
erty of the school winning it three times. A "League Cup" shall be given 
to the school failing to hold the "University of Oregon Cup" a second 
year, said "League Cup" to be held permanently by the school. 

6. Each school shall appoint a timekeeper. The two timekeepers shall 
sit directly in front of the speakers, and shall enforce the time limit and 
shall give such w^arning as the leader of each team shall direct. 



Tlie following score card shall be handed each judge, for his private 
use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote : 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 

First Speaker 

Second Speaker.... 

Third Speaker .... 

Total 



Argument 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness 



Total 



Negative 

First Speaker ... 

Second Speaker. 

Third Speaker . 

Total 



Argument 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness 



Total 



N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 
First Speaker 


Argument ' Rebuttal 


Effectiveness Total 


Second Speaker.... 






Third Speaker .... 


1 




Total . 




! 






1 


Negative 
First Speaker 


Argument Rebuttal 


Effectiveness Total 


Second Speaker . 








Third Speaker .... 








Total 















N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less tlian 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote.) 



Affirmative 

First Speaker 

Second Speaker.... 

Third Speaker .... 

Total 


Argument I Rebuttal I Effectiveness 

1 


Total 




1 













1 








1 




Negative 

First Speaker 

Second Speaker.... 
Third Speaker .... 
Total 


Argument 


Rebuttal Effectiveness 


Total 




1 






■ 






1 













N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The jiuljjfes shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "nei;;:ative," seal in an envelope and 
hand to the presiding officer. 

II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 

delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on the 
merits of the question, 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope and 
hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will he 
given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 

delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on the 
merits of the question, -r-r^ , , - y r.~ -^" ; 

V. No judge shall under anH«[lIrclHli8t»T%<[»els j^^e af -consolation vote. 

MOV S- TO 

iNSTRUj(j;jijij/(g^]'p(^ (DfDitMlOIS 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope and 
hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated 
at the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall 
give the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be 
given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms : 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromi)lu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 

delivery. 

IV. Decision should be l-ased on the merits of the debate and not on the 
merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



^:'':'M'I^^' 



"^ ' ^ DnIVERSITY of OREGON BULLETIN 

New Series November 15, 1917 Vol. XIV, No. 15 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1917-1918 



^>^#^ 




..I br 



Prepared by 

R. W. PRESCOTT 

Secretary of the League 

Chief of Bureau of Public Discussion 

Extension Division University of Oregon 



'LLij^iv.?! 



Published monthly by the University of Oregon, and entered at the postoffice In Eaarene, Oregon, 

as second-class matter 



THE limjd 

OF THE 

DHIVEBSirr Of ILUNoiS 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL 
DEBATING LEAGUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1917-1918 







THE LIBRARY OF THE 

NOV 1-1929 

''university of ILLINOIS 



SALEM, OREGON: 
STATE PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1917 




JOSEPH HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 
Champions of Oregon. 1916-17 




SILVERTDX HKiH SClKjoL DEl'.ATlXt; TKAM 
Champions of Western Oregon 




PHILOMATH HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 




MILTON-FREEWATER HIGH SCHOOLS DEBATING TEAM 
Ruth Steen, Pearl Oliver, Delbert Bowlus, Effie Torgerson 




NORTH BEND HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 

Upper row, left to right — ^Karl Raab, Horace Byle, B. E. Ralston (coach). Lower 

row — Olive Philip, Myron Gurnea 




THE DALLES HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 

Upper row — Hugh Hadly, Francis Radliff, Roscoe Roberts. Lower row — Hildred 

Egbert, Goldie Gibson, Lena Newton (coach), Bernice Bright 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATINCi LEAGUE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Championship Schedule, 1917 11 

Constitution and Bylaws 27-32 

Debate League Calendar for 1917-18 9 

District Questions for Debate 9 

Districts and Directors, 1917-18 10 

Executive Committee 9 

List of Schools in Debate League, 1916-17 12 

Message from the Retiring Secretary 13, 14 

Message of President Boyd 13 

Officers for the Year 1917-18 9 

Oregon State Library Notes 15-26 

Pictures of Competitors in State Championship Finals : 

Joseph 4 

Ashland 2 

Pictures of Winners in Interdistrict Debates : 

Klamath Falls 18 

Milton-Freewater 6 

North Bend 7 

Nyssa - -. 19 

Philomath 6 

Seaside 26 

Silverton 5 

The Dalles 7 

Score Cards for Use of Judges - 33, 34 

State Champions 12 

State Question for Debate - 9 

Sulgects of Debates Held by the League -. - 11 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1917-18 

Charles H. Boyd, Principal of Highland School, Portland . President 
R. W. Prescott, Chief of Bureau of Public Discussion, University 

of Oregon, Eugene Secretary-Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

P. L. Campbell, President of the University of Oregon 

J. A. Churchill, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Charles H. Boyd, Principal of Highland School, Portland 

Cornelia Marvin, Librarian, Oregon State Library 

Robert W. Prescott, Secretary of League, University of Oregon 



STATE QUESTION FOR DEBATE, 1917-18 

Resolved, that, at the end of the present war, the United States should 
become a member of a league of nations possessing power to enforce the 
decisions of its international court. 



DISTRICT QUESTIONS FOR DEBATE 

Northern Willamette and Southern Willamette Districts : Monroe Doctrine* 

Southern Oregon and Coos Bay Districts : Open Shop* 

Lower Columbia and Upper Columbia Districts: Single Tax* 

Umatilla and Eastern Oregon Districts : Industrial Arbitration* 

Southeastern Oregon and South-Central Oregon Districts: Unicameral 

Legislature* 
West Side District : Government Ownership of Railways* 



DEBATE LEAGUE CALENDAR FOR 1917-18 

October 13 — Fee payable to Secretary-Treasurer. 

October 30 — Last date for entering the league. 

November 24 — District Directors file schedule of preliminary debates with 

Secretary. 
February 2 — District Directors report district champions to Secretary. 
April 13 — Very latest date for settlement of last interdistrict contest. 
May 10 — Final debate for Championship of Oregon at the University of 

Oregon. 



* General subject only. Phraseology will be found at the head of the 
bibliography section. 



10 ()RP:(;0N HKiH SCHOOL I)EBATIN(4 LP]A(UTE 



1917-18 DISTRICTS 

Northern Willamette — C. W. Boetticlier, Albany, Director. Clackamas, 
Linn, and Marion Counties. Champion in 1917 : ' Silverton. 

Southern Willamette — R. L. Kirk, Springfield, Director. Lane and part 
of Douglas Counties. Champion in 1917 : Philomath. 

Southern Oregon — George A. Briscoe, Ashland, Director. Josephine, 
Jackson and part of Douglas Counties. Champion in 1917 : Ashland. 

Coos Bay — F. A. Tiedgen, Marshfield, Director. Curry, Coos,, and part 
of Douglas Counties. Champion in 1917 : North Bend. 

Lower Columbia — Myron C. Gaston, Seaside, Director. Clatsop, Colum- 
bia, and Multnomah Counties, ^yith the exception of the city of Portland. 
Champion in 1917 : Seaside. 

Upper Columbia — H. C. Baughman, Prineville, Director. Hood River, 
Wasco, Sherman, Jefferson, Crook, and Deschutes Counties. Champion in 
1917: The Dalles. 

Umatilla — J. O. Russell, Director, pro tem. (William, Morrow, Uma- 
tilla and Wheeler Counties. Champion in 1917 : Milton. 

Eastern Oregon — A. C. Hampton, La (Grande, Director. Union and 
Wallowa Counties. Champion in 1917 : Joseph. 

Southeastern Oregon — G. A. Ruring, Vale, Director. Grant, Baker, 
Malheur and Harney Counties. Champion in 1917 : Nyssa. 

South-Central Oregon — C. R. Bowman, Klamath Falls, Director. Klam- 
ath and Lake Counties. Champion in 1917 : Klamath Falls. 

West Side — George W. Hug, McMinnville, Director. Benton, Lincoln, 
Polk, Yamhill, Tillamook, and AVashington Counties. Organized in 1917. 

Portland— S. F. Ball, Franklin High School, Portland. Director. City 
of Portland. Organized in 1917. 



ORE(;ON HKiH SC'HOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



1917 CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE 



Finalists 
and Champions 



11 



Winners by 
Districts 


Winners in 
First Round 


The Dalles 

V. 

Milton 


- The Dalles 


Joseph 

V. 

Nyssa' 


- Joseph 


Seaside 

V. 

Silverton 


- Silverton 


Ashland 

V. 

Klamath Falls 


- Ashland 


North Bend 

V. 

Philomath 


- Philomath 



Joseph 



Silverton 



Philomath 



Joseph 



L Silverton 



^ Joseph 



J 



The state championship debate was held in Guild Hall, at the University of 
Oregon, on May 11, 1917. Joseph high school, represented by Guy Davis and 
Arthur Rudd and coached by Miss Lexie Strachan, principal, won the state 
championship over Silverton high school, represented by Rholin Cooley and 
Edwin Durno, and coached by B. H. Conkle. 



SUBJECTS OF DEBATES HELD BY LEAGUE 



Year 



1907-08 



High 
Schools 
Enrolled 



1911-12 

1912-13 
1913-14 
1914-15 

1915-16 
1916-17 
1917-18 



28 



1908-09 ! 34 
1909-10 35 

1910-11 



41 



28 

28 
33 
41 

51 

70 



State Question 



Proportional Repre- 
sentation 

Ship Subsidies 

Guarantee of Bank 
Deposits 

National Conserva- 
tion of National 
Resources 

Cabinet System of 
State Government.— 

Large Navy 

Tariff 

Government Owner- 
ship of Railroads 

Swiss Military System 

Health Insurance 

International Peace 
League 



President 



E. T. Marlatte 



A. L. Briggs 

W. R. Rutherford 
W. R. Rutherford 
R. W. Kirk 



R. L. Kirk 



Chas. H. Boyd 



Secretarv 



E. E. Decou 



E. E. Decou 

J. L. Johnson 
R. W. Prescott 
R. W. Prescott 



Earl Kilpa trick 



R. W. Prescott 



12 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

STATE CHAMPIONS 

The "Regents Cup" given by the members of the Board of Regents 
of the University of Oregon as individuals to become the property of the 
school winning it twice, is in the permanent possession of Grants Pass, 
having been won by the following high schools : 

1907-08— Lebanon. 

1908-09— Grants Pass 

1909-10— Pendleton. 

1910-11— Grants Pass. 
The "University of Oregon Cup" given by the Laurean and Eutaxian 
Societies of the University and by Professor E. E. DeCou, founder of the 
league, is presented annually to the State Champions and will become the 
permanent property of the school winning it three times. This cup has 
been won by the following high schools : 

1911-12— Albany. 

1912-13— North Bend. 

1913-14— Pendleton. 

1914-15— Salem. 

1915-16— Crook County at Prineville. 

1916-17— Joseph. 

LIST OF SCHOOLS IN DEBATE LEAGUE, 1916-17 

North Willamette District — Amity, Canby, Estacada, Forest Grove, 
Gaston, Hubbard, Hillsboro, Jefferson, McMinnville, Molalla, Mill City, 
Milwaukie, Oregon City, Salem, Sheridan, Silverton, Stayton, Tillamook, 
Turner, Woodburn. 

South Willamette District — Albany, Corvallis, Eugene, Junction City, 
Lebanon, Philomath, Scio, Springfield. 

Southern Oregon District — Ashland, Central Point, Glendale, Grants 
Pass, Medford, Phoenix, Talent. 

Coos Bay District — Bandon, Coquille, Marshfield, Myrtle Point, North 
Bend. 

Lower Columbia District — Astoria, Clatskanie, Corbett, Scappoose, 
Seaside Union. 

Upper Columbia District — Culver, Madras Union, Moro, Prineville, The 
Dalles, \Yasco. 

Umatilla District — Athena, Condon, Fossil (Wheeler County High 
School), Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, Pendleton, Stanfield (Reeves High 
School). 

Eastern Oregon District — Elgin, Enterprise, Joseph, La Grande, Lostine, 
Union, Wallowa. 

Southeastern Oregon District — Nyssa, Ontario, Vale. 

South-Central Oregon District — Klamath Falls, Lakeview. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE . 13 

THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

August 14, 1917. 
To Members of High School Debating League: 

We may again feel proud of the success attained by the Debating 
League during the year just closed. It has been one of the big years of 
the league. Its success is due to the individual cooperation of debaters 
and high school faculty members of the entire state, which cooperation 
the executive committee heartily appreciates. 

While there are a large number of schools on the membership roll, yet 
we note a number of our large city high schools that are not members, 
failing to give to their schools this valuable experience. Portland will 
undoubtedly come in this year and we hope others, large and small, will 
not fail to act early. 

With the growing membership, the problem of supplying reference 
material is becoming one of considerable concern. To supply seventy-five 
or more teams with material on one question is almost an impossibility, 
thus the necessity of a number of questions seems imperative. A winning 
team needs the experience and should be able to cope with more than one 
question. Let us endeavor to do away with "set" debates and develop to 
a still higher degree, clear thinking. 

I congratulate the league on the high standard it has set regarding 
plagiarism and spying and feel sure that our teams and coaches will give 
special attention to these important matters. 

The interest and financial support this league has received from the 
State University is probably overlooked by some of our members, but I 
desire here to acknowledge, on behalf of the schools of the state, this 
effort put forth by this institution for the advancement of our students. 
Also, before closing, a word of appreciation to Mr. Kilpatrick for his 
executive skill and whole-hearted interest in handling the details of 
the past year's work. Respectfully yours, 

CHAS. H. BOYD, President of the League. 

LETTER FROM MR. EARL KILPATRICK, RETIRING SECRETARY 
OF THE DEBATING LEAGUE 

September 11, 1917. 
To the Members of the Oregon High School Debating League: 

Every standard four-year high school in Oregon ought as a matter of 
course to belong to the Oregon High School Debating League. As more 
and more high schools come in, the districts of the league should be made 
smaller and smaller until finally we shall find it possible in most districts 
to carry on a program of interscholastic debates that will give every school 
an opportunity to debate several times a year. 

The Extension Division pledges anew its most loyal support to the 
debate league in the appointment of Mr. Robert W. Prescott, secretary of 
the league, as chief of its new bureau of public discussion. Mr. Prescott, 
as professor of public speaking at the University of Oregon, has given 



14 ORECiON HKiH SC^HOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

a strikiiii; proof of the effectiveness of scientific instruction in oral English 
and debating. His teams have ranked high in intercollegiate debates in 
the northwest and on the coast, and in every case have studied the question, 
analyzed the proposition, determined the issue, collected evidence and 
prepared arguments wholly without aid from the coach, except such aid 
as most properly comes from training in the principles of debating and 
laboratory work in the application of those principles. Mr. Prescott's 
success ought to be an inspiration to high school coaches throughout the 
state and ought to strengthen them in their determination to lose willingly 
rather than make any departure from the canons of good sportsmanship 
and fairness in the preparation of interscholastic debates. 

Good sportsmanship in the league has been encouraged and developed 
by the large measure of decentralization which characterizes the operations 
of the league. In some states all details of scheduling, of selection of 
judges and of arrangement of dates are made from the central state office. 
In the Oregon league practically every matter except the selection of a 
uniform question and the setting of the necessary dates to insure the 
determination of the championship is left to arrangement by the principal 
or representative of contesting schools. It may be that occasionally we 
still have some sparring over the selection of judges and very infrequently 
some school seems willing to take a slight advantage over its neighbor, 
but these exceptions have come to be rare indeed. 

The student may find in the debating league contests a spur to his 
ambition to have his name engraved upon the championship cup. The 
high school student body may very properly cherish a desire to see the 
school debating team victorious in the final contest at the university in 
May. The community most properly will rally to the support of its 
debating team and give it every encouragement that will make for a 
successful season. The coach and the high school principal may take 
pardonable pride in a championship honorably won. But every one — 
debater, students, townspeople, principal and coach — must realize that 
victory is only an incident in a game that is w^ell worth while for the 
game's sake. Most of all, the student who takes part and the coach who 
directs must see in the interscholastic debate an opportunity for putting 
into practice the classroom training in oral English, for adhering most 
religiously to the ideals of good sportsmanship, for promoting public dis- 
cussion on questions that affect the welfare of our citizenship, and for 
making better citizens out of those who are privileged to take part. 

The league will be greatly benefited by having the active interest of 
all of its members, and every school should be represented at the annual 
meeting which will take place at Portland during the State Teachers' 
Association in December of this year. 

I take this opportunity to express to the members of the league my 
appreciation of the many courtesies received from all of them during 
the two years that I have acted as secretary, and to bespeak for Mr. 
Prescott the same measure of consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EARL KILPATRICK, Retiring Secretary. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATI NG LEAGUE 15 

OREGON STATE LIBRARY NOTES 

AIDS FOR DEBATERS 

A list of books recommended by the State Library for higli school 
libraries. The prices in parentheses are the "school prices" from the 
State School Library List. 

Parliamentary Practice: 

Gushing. New Cushing's manual of parliamentary law and practice ; 

rev. by C. K. Gaines. Johnson, Blagden & McTurnan. 75c, 
Paul. Parliamentary law. Century. 75c (68c). 
Robert. Primer of parliamentary law. Doubleday. 75c (57c). 
Robert. Rules of order. New ed. Scott. $1.00 (80c). 

Public Speaking: 

Clark & Blanchard. Practical public speaking. Scribner. $1.00 (90c). 
Everts. Vocal expression : a class-book of voice training and interpre- 
tation. Harper. $1.00 (90c). 
Shurter. Extempore speaking for school and college. Ginn. 90c (77c). 

Debating : 

Alden. Art of debate. Holt. $1.12 ($1.00). 

Carnegie library, Pittsburg. Debate index. 2d ed. Pittsburg, Carnegie 
library. 20c. 

An index to the debaters' manuals in the Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. 
Two supplements to this edition have been published (5c each). 
Foster. Argumentation and debating. Houghton. $1.25. 

Contains specimen briefs and debates and a list of propositions for 
debate for advanced students. 
Foster. Debating for boys. Sturgis. $1.00 (80c). 

Foster. Essentials of exposition and argument. Houghton. 90c (78c). 
The best book upon the subject. Based upon his "Argumentation and 
debating." 
Gardiner. The making of arguments. Ginn. $1.00. 
Jones. Manual for debaters, with a list of questions and a bibliography. 

University of Washington. 15c. 
Laycock, Craven & Spofford. Manual of argumentation for high schools 
and academies. Macmillan. 50c (44c). 
Excellent book for beginners. 
Laycock & Scales. Argumentation and debate. Macmillan. $1.10. 

A good exposition of the principles of debating. More advanced than 
the book above. 
Lyon. Elements of debating. University of Chicago. $1.00 (95c). 
Phelps, comp. Debaters' manual. Wilson. $1.25. 

Compiled from various sources. Contains directions for the prepara- 

.tion of a debate, and for the organization and management of 

debating societies, with bibliographies on many subjects suitable 

for debates. 

Thomas. Manual of debate. American Book Co. 80c (68c). 

Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Debating societies : 

organization and procedure. 2d ed. University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. How to judge a debate. 

University of Wisconsin. 10c. 
Wisconsin. University. Extension Division. Principles of effective 
debating. 3d ed. Wilson. 15c. 

Questions with Briefs: 

Brookings & Ringwalt. Briefs for debate on current political, economic 
and social topics. Longmans. $1.25. 
Note preface on "The art of debate." 



16 ()RP](i()N HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



Carpenter. Debate oiitliiies on public (piestions. New ed. Broadway 

Pub. Co. $1.00. 
Rinjjwalt. Briefs on public (luestions. Longmans. $1.20 (95c). 
Bobbins. High school debate book. McClurg. $1.00 (S5c). 

Excellent for beginners. 
Shurter. Both sides of 100 public questions. Hinds. Noble & Eldredge. 

$1.25. 
University debaters" annual ; ed. by E. C. Mabie. 2 v. Wilson, each 

$1.S0. 

Periodical Articles: 

Readers' guide to periodical literature, 1900-1904. Wilson. $24.00. 

1905-1909. Wilson. $24.00. 

1910-1914. Wilson. $32.00. 

Annual volume. Wilson. $7.00. 

These volumes are sold at special rates governed by the size of the 

library. 
A file of some of the best periodicals is desirable, and a team which is 
constantly debating public questions must have access to the 
current numbers of the Outlook and Nation. Indexes to current 
magazines and newspapers are essential. All available indexes are 
owned by the State Library, and will be consulted for any subject 
upon request. It is possible that many of the magazine references 
may be borrowed from the people of the different towns. Articles 
indexed in the publications noted above may be rented from the 
Wilson Package Library, 208 University Bank Bldg., Minneapolis, 
Minn. Seven articles will be loaned for two weeks for fifty cents ; 
additional articles in the same order, five cents each. A charge of 
one-half rate will be made for an extension of two weeks or a 
fraction, for all articles except briefs and reports. No articles 
loaned for less than fifty cents. 

Government Documents (apply to Department or Congressman) : 

The library should have a file of the reports and bulletins of the Labor 
Department ; sets of reports of the Department of Commerce ; a set 
of publications of last census ; the Statistical Abstract ; the last 
Official Directory; Consular reports (with indexes) ; recent volumes 
of Congressional Record ; Presidents' messages ; Industrial Commis- 
sion report (difficult to secure) ; other sets should be secured for 
special needs—Reports of Commissioner of Immigration for debate 
on that subject, etc. 

Indexes to Government Documents: 

The following may be secured from the Superintendent of Documents, 
Washington, D. C. : 

Catalog of public documents of the 53d-61st Congresses and all depart- 
ments of the government, March 4, 1893-June 30, 1913, vols. 1-11. 

Tables of and annotated indexes to the Congressional series of United 
States public documents. 1902. 

Index to the subjects of the documents and reports and to the com- 
mittees, senators and representatives presenting them, with tables 
of the same in numerical order, being the "Consolidated index" 
provided for by the Act of January 12, 1895. 54th Congress, 1st 
session-date. December, 1895-date. 

Check list of United States public documents, 1789-1909. 3d ed. Vol. 2, 
not yet published, will be an index to Vol. 1. 

Monthly catalog. United States public documents. $1.10 a year. 

State Documents: 

Every high school should have access to recent Oregon state documents, 
and particularly the Oregon Blue Book (1917 edition), the annual 
report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and annual report of State 
Industrial Accident Commission. Many of the public libraries 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAG UE 17 

receive one copy of each Oregon document, and their files should be 
consulted before application is made for copies for a school. The 
Oregon Blue Book is distributed by the Secretary of State. For lists 
of recent publications of the various states the Monthly list of state 
publications, w^hich may be obtained from the Superintendent of 
Documents, Washington, D. C, for 50c a year, is most useful. 

Almanacs and Year Books (the last annual issue for each is given) : 
American year book, 1916. Appleton. $3.00 ($2.70). 

Especially useful in the fields of economics, political science, public 
works, legislation, commerce, politics, and government. 
Britannica year book. Encyclopedia Britannica Co. Last issue in 1913. 

Not available until after the war. 
New international year book, 1916. Dodd. $5.00. 

Contains very full articles on all events of importance during the year 
and on all subjects that have been marked by change or progress. 
Statesman's year book, 1916. Macmillan. $3.50 ($2.80). 
World almanac and encyclopedia, 1916. New York, Press Pub. Co. 35c. 

General : 

Bliss & Binder. New encyclopedia of social reform. Funk. $7.50 

($6.00). 
Cyclopedia of American government ; ed. by A. C. McLaughlin and A. B. 

Hart. 3 V. Appleton. $22.50 ($20.25).' 

Encyclopedias : 

References are not given to these, but it is assumed that debaters will 
look up all questions in the New International and Britannica 
encyclopedias. 



HOW TO BORROW DEBATE LIBRARIES FROM THE 
STATE LIBRARY, SALEM 

These collections of material upon public questions are loaned without 
charge to Oregon schools upon proper application. This means that the 
application must be made by the principal, or by the teacher who is in 
charge of the debate work. Loans are made through public libraries when 
possible, as it is generally considered better to supplement public library 
collections so that schools shall not pay cost of transportation upon 
material which is to be had locally, and shall not deprive other schools of 
this. The rules for debate library loans may be had upon application. 
The period of the loan is three weeks with possible renewal for two weeks 
if the material is not needed elsewhere. It is better for schools to apply 
for small libraries to be kept a short time, rather than to ask for complete 
libraries which can not profitably be used in so short a time. No loans are 
made to schools which mark the books and pamphlets and return them in 
bad condition. The fine for keeping libraries beyond time is 25c a day. 
Privileges of the library are withdrawn in case of loss of pieces. 

The State Library makes every effort to meet the needs of the schools, 
but it has many borrowers among schools and debating societies and can 
do justice to all of them only by enforcing the rules strictly. 



IS OKECiON HIGH SCHOOL I)EBATIN(i LI]A(JUE 






KLAMATH FALLS HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATIN(; LEAGUE 19 

DISTRICT QUESTIONS 

SUGGESTIONS AND REFERENCES 

Only a few of the more desirable books have been given in the references 
under district questions, but the State Library can furnish books, pamphlets 
and periodical clippings on all the subjects. References to periodical 
articles are not given, but the periodical indexes should be consulted in 
every case in order to obtain the most recent information. The encyclo- 
pedias and year books should also be consulted, particularly the "New 
encyclopedia of social reform," by Bliss and Binder, and the "Cyclopedia of 
American government," edited by McLaughlin and Hart. 

1. Resolved, That the United States should abandon the Monroe doctrine. 
References : 

Hart. The Monroe doctrine : an interpretation. 1916. Little. $1.75. 
Hull. The Monroe doctrine: national or international? The problem 

and its solution. 1915. Putnam. 75c. 
Phelps, comp. Selected articles on the Monroe doctrine. 2d ed. 

1916. H. W. Wilson Company. $1.25. 

See also the standard histories of the United States. 

2. Resolved, That the principle of the open shop is justifiable. 
References : 

American economic association. Open shop or closed shop, ^in its 
Papers and proceedings of the seventeenth annual meeting, 1904. 
Part 1, pp. 140-215). American economic association. $1.00. 
Robbins, comp. Selected articles on the open versus closed shop. 

1911. H. W. Wilson Company. $1.25. 
Stockton. The closed shop in American trades unions. 1911. Johns 
Hopkins Press. $1.25. 

Many of the books in Section 330 of the "List of boolcs for school 
libraries of tlie State of Oregon, Part II," contain material on 
this subject. See specially Nos. 1678, 1692, and 1709. Debaters 
should consult the reports of the Oregon Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics, on file at public libraries. 

3. Resolved, That single tax as advocated by Henry George would be 

desirable for Oregon. 

Single tax measures under various titles have been submitted to the 
people of Oregon at each general election for several years. For 
arguments presented with these proposals see files of the 
"Voters' pamphlet" on file at public libraries. 

References : 

Bullock, comp. Selected articles on single tax. 1915. H. W. Wilson 

Company. $1.25. 
George. Progress and poverty. Doubleday. 50c. 
Post. Outlines of lectures on the taxation of land values. 1912. 

The Public. 30c. 
Shields. Single tax exposed. 1912. Oregon equal taxation league. 
Young. The single tax movement in the United States. 1916. 

Princeton University Press. $1.50. 

4. Resolved. That capital and labor should be required to settle their 

industrial disputes in legally organized courts of arbitration. 
References : 

Beman, comp. Selected articles on the compulsory arbitration of 
industrial disputes. 2d ed. 1915. H. W. Wilson Company. $1.25. 



20 ore(k:)n high school debating le ague 

Barnett & McCabe. Mediation, investigation and arbitration in 

industrial disputes. 1916. Appleton, $1.25. 
Mote. Industrial arbitration. 1916. Bobbs. $1.50. 

5. Resolved, That Oregon should abolish the state senate. 

Though there has been much discussion of the practicability of a 
single-chamber legislature no state has yet adopted the plan. 
Constitutional amendments providing for the abolition of the 
state senate in Oregon were defeated in the general elections of 
1912 and 1914. For arguments presented see "Voters' pamphlet" 
for those years. See also references in "Announcements of the 
Oregon high school debating league, 1913-14." 
References : 

Colvin. The bicameral principle in the New York legislature. 1913. 

Columbia University Press. $1.00. 
Kansas, State library. Legislative reference department. Legisla- 
tive systems. 1914. Kansas State Library. 
Moran. Tlie rise and development of the bicameral system in 
America. 1895. Johns Hopkins Press. 50c. 

6. Resolved, That the federal government should own and operate all 

interstate railways acting as common carriers in the United 
States. 

The most recent literature available is essential to a satisfactory 
treatment of this subject. Consult the "Congressional record" 
and indexes to recent periodicals. This question was debated in 
1914-15 and a bibliography will be found in the "Announcements" 
for 1914. 

References : 

Dunn. Government ownership of railways. 1913. Appleton. $1.50. 
Phelps, comp. Selected articles on government ownership of rail- 
roads. 3d ed. H. W. Wilson Company. $1.25. 




NYSSA HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 
Left to right — Evelyn Cheeley, P. P. Brainard, Clara Caugham 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 21 

INTERNATIONAL PEACE LEAGUE 

READING LIST AND SUGGESTIONS BY THE OREGON 
STATE LIBRARY 

Since its organization in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, June 17, 
1915, the League to Enforce Peace has attracted much attention and its 
program has been the cause of much discussion. The league has issued 
a large amount of material and has in preparation a brief and bibliography 
which will be available soon. Address, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Other societies issuing material which will be helpful, are: World 
Peace Foundation, 40 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston ; American Association 
for International Conciliation, 407 W. 117th Street, New York ; American 
Society for Judicial Settlement of International Disputes, Baltimore. 
Much of this literature may be obtained free, but for some a slight charge 
is made. 

In addition to references bearing directly on the League to Enforce 
Peace the bibliography lists a few of the more important books and 
magazine articles in the Oregon State Library relating to international 
arbitration and other peace proposals. There are many additional articles 
on international arbitration which can be furnished debaters. 

Material listed in the bibliography will be loaned by the State Library 
under the usual conditions. New publications will be added as rapidly as 
issued. Schools having any of this material should so state in their 
application, to avoid duplication and to insure the best service to all. 
If articles on any special point are desired, special mention of that fact 
should be made; otherwise a selection will be sent covering all sides, so 
far as possible. When letters are sent to the University of Oregon and 
the Oregon State Library at the same time, please state that, as duplicate 
material is apt to be sent, causing an unnecessary expense for postage, 
and depriving other teams of this material. 

WORLD PEACE IN GENERAL 

Books and Pamphlets: 

Babson. Future of world peace. 1915. Babson's statistical organiza- 
tion. $1.00. 
Hull. The two Hague conferences and their contribution to inter- 
national law. 1908. Ginn. $1.65. 
New international year book, 1915-1916. Dodd. $5.00 each. 

See articles on "International peace and arbitration," which give in 
brief form the present status of the various organizations, with 
outline of their proposals. 
Stein. Peace through a disentangling alliance. 1916. Washington, 

D. C, Judd & Detweiler. 
Swarthmore College. International police to enforce treaties and 
preserve peace (affirmative and negative speeches in debate against 
Pennsylvania State College and Franklin and Marshall College) 
(in University debaters' annual, 1915-16. pp. 1-42). 

Periodical Articles: 

In citing periodicals the practice of the periodical indexes has been 
followed, and the reference is given in the following order : First, 
title of article ; second, name of author ; third, name of magazine, 
followed by volume, pages and date of publication. 



22 ORE(X)N Hicm SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

Force and peace. H. C. Lodge. Annals of the American academy, 

60:11)7-212, July, 1915. 
Six essentials to permanent peace. August Sclivan. Annals of the 

American academy, 60 :222-20. July, 1915. 
America's relation to the world conflict and to the coming peace. Annals 

of the American academy, 72, July, 1917. 

May be obtained from American academy of political and social 
science, 36th and Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, for $1.00. 
Crux of the peace problem. W. J. Tucker. Atlantic, 117 :451-60, April, 

1916. 
Essentials of lasting peace. L. B. Brandeis. Harper's weekly, 60:259, 

March 13, 1915. 
Foundations of international justice. Hayne Davis. Independent, 

68 :504-13, March 10, 1910. 
Some impending national problems. Irving Fisher. Journal of political 

economy, 24:694-712, July, 1916. 
Terms of lasting peace among nations and the contribution of the 

United States toward securing their adoption : addresses delivered 

before the economic clubs of Boston and New York. National 

economic league quarterly, v. 1, no. 1, May, 1915. 50c. 
Terms of peace. New republic, 8:131-32, Sept. 9, 1916. 
Essential conditions of peace. New republic, 8 :205-7, Sept. 30, 1916. 
Peace problems. J. B. Moore. North American, 204:75-89, July, 1916. 
Theories of social organization and the problem of international peace. 

A. A. Tenney. Political science quarterly, 30 :1-14, March, 1915. 
Prolongation of peace. Simeon Strunsky. Yale review, n. s., 6 :291-306, 

January, 1917. 

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION 

Books and Pamphlets: 

Brown. International arbitration : looking toward a world-state. 1915. 

Mohonk Lake, N. Y., Lake Mohonk conference on international 

arbitration. 
Butler. The international mind : an argument for the judicial settle- 
ment of international disputes. 1912. Scribner. 75c. 
Lane (Norman Angell, pseud.) Arms and industry. 1914. Putnam. 

$1.25. 
Lane (Norman Angell. pseud.) World's highway: some notes on 

America's relation to sea power and non-military sanctions for the 

law of nations. 1915. Doran. $1.50. 
Mahan. Armaments and arbitration. 1911. Harper. $1.40. 
Reely, comp. Selected articles on world peace, including international 

arbitration and disarmament. 2d ed. 1916. H. W. Wilson Company. 

$1.25. 

Periodical Articles: 

Peace versus war : the president's solution. Andrew Carnegie. Century, 
80:307-10, June, 1910. 

International control of armaments. Robert Laidlaw. Contemporary, 
107:457-63, April, 1915. 

Federal tendency (international cooperation). J. B. Moore. Indepen- 
dent, 70:601-4, March 23, 1911. 

Why not war, and if not war, what? R. N. Lane (Norman Angell, 
pseud.) Independent, 83:183-85, August 9. 1915. 

"Equal rights" of nations ("Declaration of rights of nations" of Ameri- 
can institute of international law). New republic, 6:91-93, Feb. 
26, 1916. 

War and arbitration. J. W. Carliol. 19th century, 76:1296-1306, Dec, 
1914. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 23 

Thinking internationally. Earl Cromer. 19tli century, 80 :25-35, July, 

1916. 

Also published in Living age, 290:643-50, Sept. 9, 1916. 
International realities. P. M. Brown. North American, 203 :516-26, 

April, 1916. 

LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE 

Books and Pamphlets: 

American association for international conciliation. International con- 
ciliation. Association, 407 W. 117th Street, New York. 

The following numbers will be specially useful : 

no. 100. Moore. International cooperation. Root. Outlook for 

international law. March, 1916. 
no. 106. Taft & Bryan. Proposal for a league to enforce peace : 

affirmative, W. H. Taft; negative, W. J. Bi'yan. Sept., 1916. 
no. 113. (iiddings. The bases of an enduring peace. April, 1917. 
Special l)ulletin. Clark. Existing alliances and a league of peace. 

July, 1915. 
Special bulletin. Suh Hu. Is there a substitute for force in inter- 
national relations? 1916. 

American society for judicial settlement of international disputes. 
Judicial settlement of international disputes. Baltimore. 

See the following numbers : 

no. 19. Eliot. An international force must support an international 

tribune. Dec, 1914. 
no. 20. Marburg. World court and league of peace. Feb.. 1915. 
no. 25. Hull. Six sanctions of the international court. May, 1916. 
no. 26. Wheeler. A world court and intei'iiational police. Aug., 

1916. 
no. 28. Vance. The vision of a world court. Feb., 1917. 

Baker. American ideals advanced by the League to enforce peace. 
1916. League to enforce peace. 

Brailsford. League of nations. 1917. Macmillan. $1.75. 

Crosby. Tribunal for international disputes. 1916. Washington, Gov- 
ernment printing office. (64th Congress, 1st session. Senate. Doc. 
no. 535.) 

Elder. The League and its critics. 1916. League to enforce peace. 

Filene. International vigilance committee. 1917. League to enforce 
peace. 

Giddings. Social progress depends on success of the League. 1916. 
League to enforce peace. 

Goldsmith. League to enforce peace. 1917. Macmillan. $1.50. 

Gompers. Labor's interest in the League to enforce peace. 1916. 
League to enforce peace. 

Lake Mohonk conference on international arbitration. Report of 
21st-22d annual conferences, 1915-16. Mohonk Lake. N. Y., Lake 
Mohonk conference on international arbitration. 

Lane (Norman Angell, pseud.) America and the new world-state; a 
plea for American leadership in international organization. 1915. 
Putnam. $1.25. 

League to enforce peace. Enforced peace : proceedings of the first 
annual national assemblage. 1916. League to enforce peace. 50c. 

League to enforce peace, American branch. Independence Hall confer- 
ence held in the city of Philadelphia, Bunker Hill day (June 17), 
1915, together with speeches made at a public banquet in the 
Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on the preceding evening. 1915. League 
to enforce peace. 



24 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAG UE 

Lea^'iie to enforce peace, American branch. Its proposals and what 

they mean. 1915. League to enforce peace, 
Leaj;ue to enforce peace, American branch. Object: to establish and 

maintain peace after the close of the present war. 1915. League 

to enforce peace. 
Lodge. Great work of the I-^eague to enforce peace. 1917. League to 

enforce peace. 
Lowell. Platform on which the whole world can stand. 1916. League 

to enforce peace. 
Mathews. Church's stake in the League to enforce peace, 1917. League 

to enforce peace. 
Mussey & Duggan, ed. The foreign relations of the United States: 

a series of addresses and papers presented at the National conference 

on foreign relations of the United States, 1917. Part 1, pp, 3-187. 

1917. 116th Street and Broadway, New York, Academy of political 

science in the city of New York, (its Proceedings, v. 7, no. 2, 

July, 1917), $1.50. 
Rhett, Business indorses the League to enforce peace. 1916. League 

to enforce peace. 
Short. Program and policies of the League to enforce peace : addresses 

delivered at the eastern conference of field secretaries, September 

7-9, 1916. 1916. League to enforce peace. 
Taft. Constitutionality of the League to enforce peace. 1916. League 

to enforce peace. 
Taft, League to enforce world peace, (in National education associa- 
tion. Addresses and proceedings. 1916. pp. 41-9.) 
Wilson, G. G. Monroe doctrine and the League to enforce peace. 1917. 

League to enforce peace, 
Wilson, Woodrow and others. What public men say about the League to 

enforce peace. 1917. League to enforce peace. 
World peace foundation. Pamphlet series, 40 Mt. Vernon Street, 

Boston. 
The following numbers of the Pamphlet series will be helpful : 

V. 5. no. 2. Dickinson. The foundations of a league of peace. April, 
191o. 

v. 5, no. 5, pt. 1. Lowell. A league to enforce peace. Oct., 1915, 

V. 6, no. 3. Root. The outlook for international law, with letter 
commending the League to enforce peace. June, 1916. 

V. 6, no. 4. Wilson. The Monroe doctrine and the program of the 
League to enforce peace. Aug., 1916. 

V. 6, no. 5. Myers. The conciliation i)lan of the League to enforce 
peace, with American treaties in force. Oct., 1916. 

V, 6, no. 6. Historical light on the League to enforce peace, Dec, 
1916. 
World's greatest problem : proposed solution. 1915, League to enforce 

peace. 

Periodical Articles: 

A world league and arbitral court, W. H, Taft. Advocate of peace, 

77:145-46, June, 1915. 
The League to enforce peace. A reply to critics, by Theodore Marburg. 

Cooperation versus compulsion in the organization of the society of 

nations, by A. H. Snow. Advocate of peace, 78 :200-7, July, 1916. 
Shall the Unite<l States join a League to enforce peace? H. W. Ballan- 

tine. Advocate of peace, 79 :54-5, Feb., 1917, 
Washington meeting of the American society for the judicial settlement 

of international disputes. Theodore Marburg, American political 

science review, 5:181-94, May, 1911. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 25 

Justiciability of international disputes. J. S. Reeves. American political 

science review, 10 :70-79, Feb., 1916. 
Bases of a durable peace and the safeguards against future interna- 
tional conflicts. S. N. Patten and others. Annals of the American 

academy, 66:1-59, July, 1916. 
League to enforce peace. A. L. Lowell. Atlantic, 116 :392-400, Sept., 

1915. 
United States and the league of peace. H. N. Brailsford. Atlantic, 

119 :442-43. April, 1917. 
Our next step. F. B. Vrooman. Century, 92:193a (7 p.). June, 1916. 
Proposals for a league of peace and mutual protection among nations. 

Contemporary, 106:628-36, Nov., 1914. 
League of nations and its critics. W. H. Dickinson. Contemporary, 

111:665-73, June, 1917. 

Also published in Living age, 294:259-66, Aug. 7, 1917. 
President Wilson's peace programme and the British empire. W. A. 

Phillips, Edinburgh review, 225:227-48, April, 1917. 
National federation and world federation. W. A. Phillips. Edinburgli 

review, 226:1-27, July, 1917. 
World court. Independent, 68 :1093-95, May 19, 1910. 
League of peace. Hamilton Holt. Independent. 70 :995-99, May 11, 1911. 
International grand jury. W. I. Hull. Independent, 72 :11-16, Jan. 4, 

1912. 
Way to disarm : a practical proposal. Hamilton Holt. Independent, 

79 :427-29, Sept. 28, 1914. 
League of peace : comment and criticism on the plan proposed by the 

editor of the Independent. "The way to disarm." Independent, 

80:125-26, Oct. 26, 1914. 
League of nations. W. H. Taft and others. Independent, 82:459-62, 

June 14, 1915. 
Three presidents on the League to enforce peace. Independent, 86:264, 

May 22, 1916. 
America ready to join a League to enforce peace : address, Maj' 27, 1916 

(and editorial comment). Woodrow Wilson. Independent, 86:356- 

58, June 5, 1916. 
Why peace must be enforced. Hamilton Holt. Independent, 89 :212-13, 

Feb. 5, 1917. 
Future machinery of peace. J. G. Snead-Cox. Living age, 292 :771-79, 

March 31, 1917. 
To make the peace secure. Nation, 103 :413, Nov. 2. 1916. 
League of nations : the dangers of the proposed league contrasted with 

the advantage of using and extending the present machinery of 

arbitration at The Hague. Nation, 103 :536-38, Dec. 7, 1916. 
Mr. Wilson's great utterance. New republic, 7 :102-4, June 3, 1916. 
World court for money claims. E. M. Borchard. New republic, 7 :196- 

98, June 24, 1916. 
Germany and the league of peace. New republic, 9 :60-62, Nov. 18, 1916. 
Opposition gathers. New republic, 9 :255-57, Jan. 6, 1917. 
Roosevelt and righteousness. New republic, 9 :281-83, Jan. 13, 1917. 
Structure of peace. Herbert Croly. New republic, 9 :287-91. Jan. 13. 

1917. 
Peace by organization. H. N. Brailsford. New republic, 10 :187-90, 

March 17, 1917. 

Last chapter in his "League of nations." 
Leagues to enforce peace. I. The failure of the Holy alliance, by John 

Hall. II. Illusion of today, by F. G. Stone. 19th century, 81 :689-708, 

March, 1917. 



26 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



Problems of a peace league. C. W. Dustiii. North American, 205 :475-77, 

March, 1J)17. 
Is the peace leaiuaie a broken reed? Tridens. North American, 205:477- 

80, March. 1917. 
Can man abolish war? Harold Begbie. North American, 205:742-53, 

880-94. May, June, 1917. 
International court of arbitral justice. J. B. Scott. Outlooli, 95:348-53, 

June 18. 1910. 
Internati()nal su])reme court and bu.siness sentiment (summary of 

referendum of chambers of commerce). Outlook, 112:53-54, Jan. 12, 

1916. 
Lea.iiue of peace. Outlook, 114 :524-26, Nov. 8, 1916. 
International league for peace. Outlook, 115 :186-89, Jan. 31, 1917. 
The British league to enforce peace. Outlook, 116 :430, July 18, 1917. 
President's power to act with a peace league. Talcott Williams. Review 

of reviews, 55 :148-51, Feb., 1917. 
World court : a maiijazine of international progress, v. 1-date. Equitable 

building. New York. World's court league. 



LEAGUES OTHER THAN LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE 

Books and Pamphlets: 

Bourne, comp. Towards an enduring peace : a symposium of peace 
proposals and programs, 1914-16. 1916. American association for 
international conciliation. 

League of peace, pp. 119-239. 

Cosmos, pseud. The basis of dural)le peace. 1917. Scribner. 30c. 

Jordan. Ways to lasting peace. 1916. Bobbs. $1.00. 

Lippmann. Stakes of diplomacy. 2d ed. 1917. Holt. 60c. 

Periodical Articles: 

A constructive peace policy for America. J. P. Norton. Annals of the 

American academy, 54 :270-76, July, 1914. 
Annals of the American academy, 61 :217-83, Sept., 1915. 

Articles on "Industrial conservation through world peace." 
Armed pacifism. J. M. Donell. Contemporary, 111 :290-300, March, 1917. 
Best use for a big navy. Independent, 87 :325-26, Sept. 4, 1916. 
Constructive mediation : an interpretation of the ten foremost proposals. 

G. W. Nasmyth. Survey, 33 :616-20, March 6, 1915. 
Permanent peace: a program of decentralization. August Schvan. 

Survey, 33 :621-24, 639-42, March 6, 1915. 
Toward world government : an interpretation of ten more constructive 

proposals. (;. W. Nasmyth. Survey, 35 :183-87, Nov. 20, 1915. 
Dawn of the world's peace. Hamilton Holt. World's work, 21 : 14128-46, 

March, 1911. 



i f r II 



SEASIDE HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING TEAM 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 27 

CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 
OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

ARTICLE I 

NAME 

This organization shall be kno\yn as the Oregon High School Debating 
League. 

ARTICLE II 

OBJECT 

The object of this League is improvement in debate among the students 
in the high schools of the State of Oregon. 

ARTICLE III 
MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any public high school in Oregon may become a member 
of this League upon application to the Executive Committee of the League 
and shall retain such membership so long as it conforms to the constitution 
and bylaws. 

Section 2. All schools seeking admission for any particular year must 
join by October 15 of that year. 

Section 3. The annual dues of one dollar shall l)e paid to the Treasurer 
by October 15. Failure to pay dues shall cancel membership. 

ARTICLE lY 

OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, DUTIES 

Section 1, The officers of the League shall be a President and a 
Secretary-Treasurer. The Secretary-Treasurer shall be the chief of the 
Bureau of Public Discussion of the Extension Division, University of 
Oregon. The President shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee of the League shall consist of the 
President and the Secretary, who shall act with the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, the President of the LTniversity of Oregon, and the 
Secretary of the Oregon Library Commission. This committee shall have 
power to increase its membership by two additional members, one of whom 
shall be a county superintendent. 

Section 3. (a) It shall be the duty of the President to preside at the 
annual meeting, and at the final contest, and, when necessary, to call 
meetings of the Executive Committee. 

(b) It shall be the duty of the Secretary-Treasurer to keep minutes 
of the annual meeting, and of the meetings of the Executive Committee; 



28 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



to disburse funds ii])on order of the Executive Committee ; to collect annual 
dues and perform other duties pertainiiii? to the office. 

(c) It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee: 

To pair the district champion teams, to choose sides and to make other 
arrangrements for the interdistrict contests, on the basis of convenience 
and least expense. The pairing and choice of sides for the interdistrict 
and final debates shall begin before the conclusion of the district debates, 
and the Secretary shall submit the schedule to the Executive Committee 
before it becomes final. 

To cooperate with the two directors, whose districts shall be represented 
in the final contest, in making arrangements for that contest. 

To select the question for debate. 

To prepare and have printed each year, before October 1, a year book 
containing the latest revision of the constitution and bylaws, the list of 
names and addresses of the officers, statement of question for district, 
interdistrict and final contests, with bibliography, and such other matter 
as, in their judgment, may be helpful to the members of the League. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall appoint for each district 
one director who shall be the principal (or other representative) of one of 
the League high schools in his district. 

It shall be the duty of the director : 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other representa- 
tives) of the League high schools in his district. 

To cooperate with the principals (or other representatives) of the 
League high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, and in making 
other arrangements for the several series of district contests on the basis 
of convenience and expense. In case of disagreement the district director 
shall have final authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the Secretary of the League, for permanent record, and 
for reference of the Executive Committee, not later than November 5, 
an approved schedule of the debates for his district. He shall report to 
the Secretary the results of all contests immediately after they shall have 
been held, giving the names of the contesting schools and their represen- 
tatives, together with the votes of the judges. No debate shall be 
considered as having been held under the auspices of the League unless 
the schedule shall have been filed with the Secretary as above directed, 
and the results immediately reported. 

To furnish the Executive Committee all other necessary information 
with regard to the workings of the League in his district. 

ARTICLE V 

MEETINGS, ELECTIONS 

Section 1. The directors in the several districts shall, at any time 
they deem it necessary, call meetings of the principals (or other represen- 
tatives) of the league high schools in their respective districts. 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 29 

Section 2. The annual meeting shall be held at the time of the State 
Teachers' Association. At this meeting the officers shall be elected, each 
for a period of one year. Each league high school shall be entitled to 
only one vote. 

ARTICLE VI 
DEBATING DISTRICTS 

The State shall be divided into debating districts by the Executive 
Board of the League. 

ARTICLE VII 
CONTESTS 

Section 1. District Contests. The district contests, held by teams 
representing the several high schools within each district, shall occur 
between the first of November and the first of February. The team 
winning in the last series of these contests shall be the district champion 
team. The triangular system of debate is urged wherever conditions 
permit, leaving the method of grouping by twos in other cases. The 
number of debaters on the team shall be two unless a definite number 
is agreed upon by the schools participating. 

Section 2. Interdistrict Contests. The interdistrict contests, held 
by the several district champion teams, shall occur between the first of 
March and the first of May. The two teams winning in these contests 
shall be the two interdistrict champion teams. 

Section 3. Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two inter- 
district champion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon at a 
time fixed by the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Section 1. The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the schools 
which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date in at least 
three subjects that they are taking at the time of tlie contest. 

No person over twenty-one years of age at the date of his enrollment 
for the school year shall be eligible to represent a high school in a 
contest held under the auspices of the League. 

Section 2. The team that shall represent any league high school shall 
be selected by a series of tryouts. In cases where this seems impracticable, 
a different method may be used when authorized by the Executive 
Committee. Without such permission a team selected in any other 
manner shall not be considered eligible to the district debates. 

Section 3. At all contests the debaters shall be separated from the 
audience and shall receive no coaching while the debate is in progress. 

Section 4. At all contests, in which each team shall be represented by 
three members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as follows : 

First speaker, affirmative, twelve minutes (introduction and direct 
argument). 



30 O RE(K)N HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

First speaker, ne.uative, tweh'e minutes (direct ar.mimeiit aiul refu- 
tation). 

Second spealcer, affirmative, t^Yelve. minutes (direct arjj;ument and refu- 
tation!. 

Second speaker, ne.uative, tAvelve minutes (direct arjj;ument and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, affirmative, twelve minutes (direct ar.i^ument and refu- 
tation). 

Third speaker, neijative, twelve minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Closer, nejjjative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Section 5. At all contests in which each team shall be represented by 
two members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as follows : 

First speaker, affirmative, fifteen minutes (introduction and direct 
arjjjument). 

First speaker, negative, fifteen minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation ) . 

Second speaker, affirmative, fifteen minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Second speaker, negative, fifteen minutes (direct argument and refu- 
tation). 

Closer, negative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

No new argument allowed in either of the last two speeches. 

Section 6. There shall be no cheering while any debater is speaking 
and the chairman or presiding officer shall make this announcement before 
the debate and shall use all means to enforce the rule. In cases of 
cheering, time so consumed may be made up to the speaker at the 
discretion of the chairman or presiding officer. 

ARTICLE IX 

Section 1. At each contest there shall be three judges selected on the 
basis of capability and impartiality ; and so far as possible, they shall be 
nonlocal. The principals of any two contesting schools may by mutual 
agreement, however, decide upon one judge to determine the issue, provided 
that three judges must be selected in all cases where the principals can not 
agree upon one judge. 

Section 2. The judges for interdistrict debates shall be appointed by 
the P:]xecutive Committee, but in no case shall a member of said committee 
take part in the selection of judges in a case where he is personally 
interested. For the district contests, the principals of the two schools 
represented shall select the judges as follows : The princii)al of the visiting 
school shall submit a list of nine judges to the home school, from which 
to select three. If less than this number are satisfactory, the principal 
of the home school shall present a like list for selection, and so on until 



OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 31 

three mutually satisfactory judges are selected. The consideration of 
judges shall be taken up a month or more before the contest, and if 
possible, the final selection shall be made not less than a week before 
the debate. 

Section .3. As soon as the judges shall be selected, they shall be 
supplied each with a copy of "How to Judge a Debate." Copies can be 
secured from the district directors or from the Secretary of the League. 

Section 4. During the debate the judges shall sit apart from one 
another. They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal, and 
effectiveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the debate 
and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the conclusion of 
the contest, without consultation with any other judge, shall write on a 
card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal it in an envelope, and 
deliver it to the presiding officer, who shall open the envelopes in sight 
of the two leaders, and then announce to the audience the decision. 

ARTICLE X 

EXPENSES 

Section 1. In all triangular and dual contests, both district and inter- 
district, in which each school is represented by an affirmative and a 
negative team, the expenses of the judges, and the hotel bills and railway 
mileage of the visiting teams (the three — or two, as the case may be — 
debaters and one member of the high school faculty) shall be pooled and 
borne equally by the competing schools. Immediately after each contest,, 
each school shall submit an itemized account of its expenses to the director 
of the district, or some one appointed by him. The director shall add the 
total expenses, divide them proportionately, and make such collections 
and reimbursements as may be necessary to effect an equitable adjustment 
of expense burdens. In all contests which involve a single debate, the 
principals of competing schools shall mutually agree upon an equitable 
division of expenses. The consideration of this cpiestion shall be taken 
up a month or more before the contest. If a satisfactory agreement 
shall not have been reached at least two weeks before the contest, the 
question shall be referred to the district director for final adjudication 
and settlement. In case the schools of any district may be able to agree 
upon some other more satisfactory system, they shall not be bound by 
this section in their intradistrict contests. 

Section 2. Whenever two competing teams may find it more con- 
venient or less expensive to meet at some halfway point, the two schools 
represented by these teams shall share equally the expense, or make 
some special arrangements for defraying the expenses of that particular 
debate. 

Section 3. At the final contest the University shall pay the expenses 
of the judges and the hotel bills and traveling expenses of the two teams. 



32 OREGON HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



ARTICLE XI 

AMENDMENTS 

This constitution and bylaws may be amended at any annual meeting 
by a majority of the league high schools present. But no school shall 
have more than one vote. Amendments may also be made at any time 
by majority vote of the Executive Committee, subject to ratification at 
the next annual meeting. 

BYLAWS 

1. It shall be considered improper to entertain judges before the 
contest at any place other than the hotel. 

2. It shall be considered dishonorable for one school to visit the debates 
of another school when these tw^o schools are likely to meet on the same 
question. 

3. It shall be considered dishonorable for any debater, in any manner, 
to plagiarize his speech. 

4. The question used in intradistrict and in interdistrict debates shall 
be the same as the State question. 

5. The "University of Oregon Cup" shall become the permanent 
property of the school winning it three times. A "League Cup" shall be 
given to the school failing to hold the "University of Oregon Cup" a 
second year, said "League Cup" to be held permanently by the school. 

6. Each school shall appoint a timekeeper. The two timekeepers shall 
sit directly in front of the speakers, and shall enforce the time limit and 
shall give such warning as the leader of each team shall direct. 

7. *Procedure in Protests and Appeals. All protests and appeals shall 
be made in writing and shall be signed by the official representative of the 
school protesting or appealing, and accompanied by evidence to substan- 
tiate the claim made, and filed with the Secretary of the League. The 
school against whom protest or appeal is made shall then have an 
opportunity to see a copy of the protest or appeal and within five days 
to submit a statement in reply, copy of which shall be sent to the protesting 
school. Upon the evidence and statement thus submitted and upon such 
other information as it may have before it, or may gather, the Executive 
Committee will decide the appeal by the procedure following: The 
Secretary will furnish identical copies of the documents in the case to 
the several members of the committee, asking from each his vote on the 
question at issue. 



* Passed by Executive Committee. In force subject to ratification at annual 
meeting in 1918. 



The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his private use, 
and shall not be handed in Vv'ith the judge's final vote : 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with \ote) 



Affirmative 

First speaker 

Second Speaker. 
Third speaker 

Total 



Negative 

First speaker 

Second Speaker. 

Third speaker 

Total 



Arg-ument 


Rebuttal Effectiveness 


Total 








! 








1 


Argument Rebuttal Effectiveness 


Total 






1 



N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 
(Not to be handed in with vote) 



Affirmative 

First speaker 

Second Speaker. 
Third speaker..... 

Total 



Argument 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness Total 



Negative 

First speaker 

Second Speaker 

Third speaker 

Total 



Argument 



Rebuttal 



Effectiveness Total 



N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON HIGH 
SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

(Not to be handed in with vote) 



Affirmative 
First speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


Second Speaker.... 










Third speaker 

Total 




















. 


Negative 
First speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


Second Speaker.... 
Third speaker 


















Total 







N. B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal, and Effectiveness. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate card 
the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope and hand 
to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated at 
the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall give 
the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be given 
credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms : 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used- to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 

delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on the 
merits of the question. 

V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate card 
the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope and hand 
to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated at 
the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall give 
the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be given 
credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms : 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 
its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 
argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 
delivery. 
IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on the 

merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstan^ea-giy^. a consolation vote. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 

I. The judges shall sit apart from oti'^»ftil(iifi^i,'^an# sli^J|l!^Jjjjf|ae con- 
clusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a separate card 
the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal in an envelope and hand 
to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indicated at 
the bottom of the face of the score card. The affirmative shall give 
the final rebuttal speech, at which time the speaker will be given 
credit for rebuttal. 
III. Definition of terms : 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered and 

its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with pleasing 

delivery. 

IV. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not on the 
merits of the question. 

V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation vote. 



c 



UNIVERSITY OF OREGON BULLETIN 



New Series 



December, 1918 



Vol. 15, No. 15 



Oregon High School 
Debating League 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
SCHOOL YEAR 1918-1919 



W^ 




^N'VEBs/ry OF umo 



Prepared by 

R. W. PEESCOTT 

Secretary of the League 

: Chief of Bureau of Public Discussion 
Extension Division, University of Oregon 



Published monthly by the University of Oregon and entered at the 
postoffioe at Eugene, Oregon, as second-class matter. 



• m n »■—»»■ n«i 



Oregon High School Debating 
League 

Officers for the Year 1918-19 

GEORGE W. HUG, Superintendent of Schools, McMinnville 

President 

R. W. PRESCOTT, Chief of Bureau of Public Discussion, 

University of Oregon, Eugene Secretary-Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

p. L. CAMPBELL 
President of the University of Oregon 

J. A. CHURCHILL 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

GEORGE W. HUG 
Superintendent of Schools, McMinnville 

CORNELIA MARVIN 
Librarian, Oregon State Library 

R. W. PRESCOTT 
Chief of Bureau of Public Discussion, University of Oregon 

State Question for Debate, 1918-19 

(The state question for debate will be phrased from the general 
subject: League of Nations. The precise proposition will be 
announced in time for full preparation of material for the inter- 
district debates.) 



District Questions for Debate 
Question District 

Resolved, That the United States Coos Bay 

should substantially increase its per- Southeastern Oregon 

manent restrictions upon immigration City of Portland 
after the war. 

Resolved, That the states should So^them Oregon 

employ a uniform system of compulsory Umatilla 

health insurance for wage earners. Southern Willamette 
(Constitutionality conceded). 

Resolved, That states, counties and ^pper Columbia 

municipalities should not bond for West Side 
public improvements. 

Resolved, That the United States Lower Columbia 

should establish a system of military South-Central Oregon 

training for boys from sixteen to Northern Willamette 

twenty years of age. Eastern Oregon 



Debate League Calendar for 1918-19 

October 12 — Fee payable to secretary-treasurer. 

December 1 — Last date for entering the league. 

December 10 — District directors file schedule of preliminary de- 
bates with the secretary. 

February 10 — District directors report district champions to the 
secretary. 

April 19 — Very latest date for settlement of last inter-district 
contest. 

May 9 — Final debate for championship of Oregon at the University 
of Oregon. 



1918-19 Districts 

Northern Willamette — C. W. Boetticher, Albany, Director. 
Clackamas, Linn and Marion Counties. Champion in 1918: Salem. 

Southern Willamette — C. A. Howard, Eugene, Director. Lane 
and part of Douglas County. Champion in 1918: Eugene. 

Southern Oregon — George A. Briscoe, Ashland, Director. Jose- 
phine, Jackson and part of Douglas Counties. Champion in 1918: 
Grants Pass. 

Coos Bay — Kobert Goetz, North Bend, Director. Curry, Coos 
and part of Douglas Counties. Champion in 1918: Marshfield. 

Lower Columbia — R. W. Prescott, Eugene, Director. Clatsop, 
Columbia and Multnomah Counties, with the exception of the city 
of Portland. 

Upper Columbia — R. L. Kirk, The Dalles, Director. Wasco, 
Sherman, Jefferson, Crook and Deschutes Counties. Champion in 
1918: The Dalles. 

Umatilla— J. O. Russell, Pilot Rock, Director. Gilliam, Morrow, 
Umatilla and Wheeler Counties. Champion in 1918: Hermiston. 

Eastern Oregon — Roy Conklin, Wallowa, Director. Union and 
Wallowa Counties. Champion in 1918: Wallowa. 

Southeastern Oregon — Mrs. Basil E. Ralston, Burns, Director. 
Grant, Baker, Malheur and Harney Counties. Champion in 1918: 
Ontario. 

South-Central Oregon — C. R. Bowman, Klamath Falls, Director. 
Klamath and Lake Counties. Champion in 1918: Lakeview. 

West Side — R. U. Moore, McMinnville, Director. Benton, 
Lincoln, Polk, Yamhill, Tillamook and Washington Counties. 
Champion in 1918: Forest Grove. 

City of Portland— F. S. Ball, Portland, Director. High Schools 
in the City of Portland. Champion in 1918: Franklin High School. 



Subjects of Debates Held by the League 

1907-08 — Proportional Eepresentation 

1908-09— Ship Subsidies 

1909-10 — Guarantee of Bank Deposits 

1910-11 — National Conservation of National Resources 

1911-12 — Cabinet System of State Government 

1912-13— Large Navy 

1913-14— Tariff 

1914-15 — Government Ownership of Railroads. 

1915-16 — Swiss Military System 

1916-17 — Health Insurance 

1917-18 — International Peace League 

1918-19— League of Nations. 



1 




C5 




0) 




I 


•2 


i 


13 

jQ 








A 




<--*— 


'— *.. 


-^~-^— - 


,-i^ 


.^A~--»— > 


o 


. 












ZQ 


02 












.& 


W 




CQ 




t3 


c3 
OS 


o 

1 


.a 


s 

o 


P 


o 

03 

o 


03 


^ 


,— > . 


, ^-^^ 


. '-^N 




.^ . 


——■ — . 


O 


OQ 












oo 




03 








ra 






O 




03 

O ;-! 


-i o3 


in 

fM o3 






1 


a 

'o _ 


.1 




1 

go 




7^ a 

o ^ 


05 


a 


215 

S9 




0) 


-M-^ 


03 '-5 


OJ M 


r£j 


^a .£3 




.^1 




DP 


1^ 


-U 03 
J3 O 





state Champions 

The "Regents Cup," given by the members of the Board of 
Eegents of the University of Oregon as individuals to become the 
property of the school winning it twice, is in the permanent 
possession of Grants Pass, having been won by the following high 
schools: 

1907-08— Lebanon 

1908-09 — Grants Pass 

1909-10— Pendleton 

1910-11— Grants Pass 

The "University of Oregon Cup," given by the Laurean and 
Eutaxian Societies of the University and by Professor E. E. 
De Cou, founder of the league, is presented annually to the State 
Champions and will become the permanent property of the school 
winning it three times. The cup has been won by the following 
high schools: 

1911-12— Albany 

1912-13— North Bend 

1913-14— Pendleton 

1914-15— Salem 

1915-16— Crook County at Prineville 

1916-17— Joseph 

1917-18— Salem 



The President's Message 

October 1, 1918. 
To the Members of the Oregon High School Debating League: 

We feel that the success of the debating league is going to 
be greater than ever this year. The league is growing constantly 
in interest and in standards of debating; and the live questions 
chosen for 1918-19 discussion, a good many of them related to 
the war, ought to give an added enthusiasm to the work. The 
times were never better than now for good live debating, and it 
is hoped that no school will decline membership because of lack 
of interest or on account of not being able to finance this 
enterprise. 

The majority of the high schools in Oregon are to be con- 
gratulated on the way in which they have taken up and promoted 
debate. It is only the few that need to be "rounded up." The 
university and the state libraries are untiring in their effort to 
help the high schools secure reference material. The state 
superintendent 's office has taken a very active part in aiding the 
league. The educational leadership of the state is behind us. 
We as high schools ought to show that we appreciate this valuable 
assistance. Let us put our shoulders to the wheel this year and 
do our part toward making the debating league an active and 
effective agent in promoting interest in and discussion of im- 
portant current problems in every high school in the state. 

Yours respectfully, 
GEORGE W. HUG, President of the League. 



Abridged Constitution and Bylaws* 

Oregon High School Debating League 

DUTIES OF DISTRICT DIEECTOES 

It shall be the duty of the director: 

To preside at the call meetings of the principals (or other 
representatives) of the league high schools in his district. 

To cooperate with the principals (or other representatives) 
of the league high schools in his district, in pairing the schools, 
and in making other arrangements for the several series of 
district contests on the basis of convenience and expense. In 
case of disagreement the district director shall have the final 
authority in pairing teams. 

To file with the secretary of the league for permanent record 
and for reference of the executive committee, not later than No- 
vember 25, an approved schedule of the debates for his district. 
He shall report to the secretary the results of all contests imme- 
diately after they have been held, giving the names of the con- 
testing schools and their representatives, together with the votes 
of the judges. No debate shall be considered as having been held 
under the auspices of the league unless the schedule shall have 
been filed with the secretary as above directed, and the results 
immediately reported. 

To furnish the executive committee with all other necessary 
information with regard to the workings of the league in his 
district. 

CONTESTS 

District Contests. The district contests, held by the teams 
representing the several high schools within each district, shall 
occur between the first of November and the first of February. 
The team winning in the last series of these contests shall be the 
district champion team. The triangular system of debate is 
urged wherever conditions permit, leaving the method of grouping 
by twos in other cases. The number of debaters on the team 
shall be two unless a definite number is agreed upon by the 
schools participating. 

Interdistrlct Contests. The interdistrict contests, held by the 
several district champion teams, shall occur between the first of 
March and the first of May. The two teams winning in these 
contests shall be the two interdistrict champion teams. 

Final Contest. The final contest, held by the two interdistrict 
champion teams, shall be held at the University of Oregon at a 
time fixed by the executive committee. 



*0n account of the war and the necessity of conserving labor 
and materials, only the most necessary provisions of the constitu- 
tion are here printed. 



MEMBERS OF TEAMS 

The debaters shall be undergraduate students of the schools 
which they represent, and shall have passing grades to date in 
at least three subjects that they are taking at the time of the 
contest. 

No person over twenty-one years of age at the date of his 
enrollment for the school year shall be eligible to represent a 
high school in a contest held under the auspices of the league. 

The team that shall represent any league high school shall be 
selected by a series of tryouts. In cases where this seems im- 
practicable, a different method may be used when authorized 
by the executive committee. Without such permission a team 
selected in any other manner shall not be considered eligible to 
the district debates. 

CONTESTS 

At all contests the debaters shall be separated from the 
audience and shall receive no coaching while the debate is in 
progress. 

At all contests, in which each team shall be represented by 
three members, the time and the order of speeches shall be as 
follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, twelve minutes (introduction and 
direct argument). 

First speaker, negative, twelve minutes (direct argument and 
refutation). 

Second speaker, affirmative, twelve minutes (direct argument 
and refutation) . 

Second speaker, negative, twelve minutes (direct argument and 
refutation). 

Third speaker, affirmative, twelve minutes (direct argument 
and refutation). 

Third speaker, negative, twelve minutes (direct argument and 
refutation). 

Closer, negative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

At all contests in which each team shall be represented by 
two members, the time and order of the speeches shall be as 
follows: 

First speaker, affirmative, fifteen minutes (introduction and 
direct argument). 

First speaker, negative, fifteen minutes (direct argument and 
refutation). 

Second speaker, affirmative, fifteen minutes (direct argument 
and refutation). 

Second speaker, negative, fifteen minutes (direct argument 

Closer, negative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 

Closer, affirmative, six minutes (rebuttal and summary). 



No new argument allowed in either of the last two speeches. 

There shall be no cheering while any debater is speaking and 
the chairman or presiding officer shall make this announcement 
before the debate and shall use all means necessary to enforce the 
rule. In cases of cheering, time so consumed shall be made up to 
the speaker at the discretion of the chairman or presiding officer. 

JUDGES 

At each contest there shall be three judges selected on the 
basis of capability and impartiality; and so far as possible they 
shall be non-local. The principals of any two contesting schools 
may by mutual agreement, however, decide upon one judge to 
determine the issue, provided that three judges must be selected 
in all cases where the principals cannot agree upon one judge. 

The judges for interdistrict debates shall be appointed by the 
executive committee, but in no case shall a member of said 
committee take part in the selection of judges in a case where he 
is personally interested. For the district contests, the principals 
of the two schools represented shall select the judges as follows: 
The principal of the visiting school shall submit a list of nine 
judges to the home school, from which to select three. If less 
than this number are satisfactory, the principal of the home 
school shall present a like list for selection, and so on until three 
mutually satisfactory judges are selected. The consideration of 
judges shall be taken up a month or more before the contest, 
and, if possible, the final selection shall be made not less than 
a week before the debate. 

During the debate the judges shall sit apart from one another. 
They shall take into consideration argument, rebuttal and effect- 
iveness, and shall base their decision on the merits of the debate 
and not on the merits of the question. Each judge at the con- 
clusion of the contest, without consultation with any other judge, 
shall write on a card the word "affirmative" or "negative," 
seal it in an envelope, and deliver it to the presiding officer, who 
shall open the envelopes in sight of the two leaders, and then 
announce to the audience the decision. 

EXPENSES 

In all triangular and dual contests, both district and inter- 
district, in which each school is ' represented by an affirmative 
and a negative team, the; expenses of the judges, and the hotel 
bills and railway mileage of the visiting teams (the three or two, 
as the case may be, debaters and one member of the high school 
faculty) shall be pooled and borne equally by the competing 
schools. Immediately after each contest, each school shall submit 
an itemized account of its expenses to the director of the district, 
or some one appointed by him. The director shall add the total 
expenses, divide them proportionately, and make such collections 



and reimbursements as mp,y be necessary to effect an equitable 
division of expenses. The consideration of this question shall 
be taken up a month or more before the contest. If a satisfactory 
agreement shall not have been reached at least two weeks before 
the contest, the question shall be referred to the district director 
for final adjudication and settlement. In case the schools of any 
district may be able to agree upon some more satisfactory system, 
they shall not be bound by this section in their intradistrict 
contests. 

Whenever two competing teams may find it more' convenient 
or less expensive to meet at i some halfway point, the two schools 
represented by these teamsi shall share equally the expense, or 
make some special arrangements for defraying the expenses of that 
particular debate. 

At the final contest the University shall pay the expenses of 
the judges and the hotel bills and traveling expenses of the two 
teams. 

BYLAWS 

1. It shall be considered improper to entertain judges before 
the contest at any place other than the hotel. 

2. It shall be considered dishonorable for one school to visit 
the debates of another school when these two, schools are likely 
to meet on the same question. 

3. It shall be considered dishonorable for any debater, in any 
manner, to plagiarize his' speech. 

4. Tlie "University of Oregon Cup" shall become the perma- 
nent property of the school winning it three times. A ** League 
Cup" shall be given to the school i failing to hold the "University 
of Oregon Cup" a second year, said "League Cup" to be held per- 
manently by the school. 

5. Each school shall appoint a timekeeper. The two time- 
keepers shall sit directly in front, of the speakers, and shall 
enforce the time limit and shall give such warning as the leader 
of each team shall direct. 

6. Procedure in Protests and Appeals. All protests land 
appeals shall be made in writing and shall be signed by the 
official representative of the school protesting or appealing, and 
accompanied by evidence to substantiate the claim made, and 
filed with the secretary of the league. The school against whom 
protest or appeal is made shall then have an opportunity to see a 
copy of the protest or appeal, and within five days to submit a 
statement in reply, copy of which shall be sent to the protesting 
school. Upon the evidence and statement thus submitted and upon 
such other information as it may have before it, or may gather, 
the executive committee will decide the appeal by the procedure 
following: The secretary will furnish identical copies of the 
documents in the case to the several members of the committee, 
asking from each his vote on the question at issue. 



The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his 
private use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON 
HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 

/ (Not to be handed in with vote) 



Affirmative 
First Speaker 
Second Speaker 
Third Speaker 
TOTAL 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness | Total 

























Negative 
First Speaker 
Second Speaker 
Third Speaker 
TOTAL 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness Total 














zzzzzzz 








N.B.— The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions: Argument, Rebuttal and Effectiveness. 



The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his 
private use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES IN OREGON 
HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 





(Not to be handed in with vote) 


Affirmative 
First Speaker 
Second Speaker 
Third Speaker 
TOTAL 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness | Total 

1 





















Negative 
First Speaker 
Second Speaker 
Third Speaker 
TOTAL 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness | Total 
1 












1 

















N.B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions : Argument, Rebuttal and Effectiveness. 



The following score card shall be handed each judge, for his 
private use, and shall not be handed in with the judge's final vote: 

SCORE CARD FOR PRIVATE USE OF JUDGES^ IN OREGON 
HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE 



(Not to be handed in with vote) 



Affirmative 
First Speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 
























TOTAL 











Negative 
First Speaker 


Argument 


Rebuttal 


Effectiveness 


Total 


Second Speaker 










Third Speaker 










TOTAL - 














N.B. — The marking shall be on a basis of 100 per cent. Not more than 
100 points and not less than 60 points shall be given for each of the three 
divisions: Argument, Rebuttal and Effectiveness. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 
I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the 
conclusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a 
separate card the word ''affirmative" or ''negative," seal 
in an envelope and hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indi- 
cated at the bottom of the face of the score card. The 
affirmative shall give the final rebuttal speech, at which 
the speaker will be given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered 

and its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

pleasing delivery. 

VI. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not 
on the merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation 
vote. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 
I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the 
conclusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a 
separate card the word "affirmative" or "negative," seal 
in an envelope and hand to the presiding officer. 
II. Each debater shall be marked under the three heads as indi- 
cated at the bottom of the face of the score card. The 
affirmative shall give the final rebuttal speech, at which 
the speaker will be given credit for rebuttal. 

III. Definition of terms: 

Argument means the substance and value of the proof offered 

and its skilful use in the discussion. 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute the direct 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

pleasing delivery. 

VI. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not 
on the merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation 
vote. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES 
I. The judges shall sit apart from one another, and shall at the 
conclusion of the debate, without consultation, write on a 
separate card the word ' ' affirmative " or " negative, ' ' seal 
in an envelope and hand to the presTdil^ p^ficpr 



II. Each debater shall be marked under fnfe tltfoe* iiifi^|s sls ,indi>^ j-^ 
cated at the bottom of the face of the score car(Jr'' Thtfi' 
affirmative shall give the final rebuttal speech, at which 



the speaker will be given credit for reljftftj^f/ / -. IQOQ 
III. Definition of terms: '^Z-!^ 

Argument means the substance and yal^e of the proof offered 

and its skilful use in the discussiMf.* i' r fj£ 1 7 y (\t ji iifc,^ 

Rebuttal means impromptu argument used to refute tniekliiMfcS 

argument of the opposing side. 

Effectiveness means the combination of good English with 

pleasing delivery. 
VI. Decision should be based on the merits of the debate and not 

on the merits of the question. 
V. No judge shall under any circumstances give a consolation 

vote.